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Oct 9, 2013

Quantum Metamaterial and the Feasibility of Invisiblity Cloaks

Posted by in categories: engineering, futurism, humor, military, transparency

Meta-materials — materials that have been engineered to have properties that absolutely do not exist in nature — such as negative refraction — are unraveling interesting possibilities in future engineering. The discovery of negative refraction has led to the creation of invisibility cloaks, for example, which seamlessly bend light and other electromagnetic radiation around an object, though such are normally restricted to cumbersome laboratory experiments with split-ring resonators and/or restricted to an insufficient slice of spectrum.

A recent article in ExtremeTech drew attention to the world’s first quantum meta-material, created recently by a team of German material scientists at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. It is believed such quantum meta-material can overcome the main problem with traditional meta-materials based on split-ring resonators, which can only be tuned to a small range of frequencies and not conducive to operate across a useful slice of spectrum. While fanciful applications such as quantum birefringence and super-radiant phase transitions are cited it is perhaps invisibility cloaks that until very recently seemed a forte of science fiction.

From Fiction - The Invisible Man

Breakthroughs at the National Tsing-Hua University in Taiwan have also made great strides in building quantum invisibility cloaks, and as the arXiv blog on TechnologyReview recently commented ‘invisibility cloaks are all the rage these days’. With such breakthroughs, these technologies may soon find mass take-up in future consumer products & security, and also have abundant military uses — where it may find the financial stimulus to advance the technology to its true capabilities. Indeed researchers in China have been looking into how to mass-produce invisibility cloaks from materials such as Teflon. We’ll all be invisible soon.

[1] The first quantum meta-material raises more questions than it answers
http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/168060-the-first-quantum-…it-answers

[2] Quantum Invisibility Cloak Hides Objects from Reality
http://www.technologyreview.com/view/516006/quantum-invisibi…m-reality/

[3] Hide the interior region of core-shell nano-particles with quantum invisible cloaks
http://www.arxiv.org/abs/1306.2120

[4] Chinese Researchers Make An Invisibility Cloak For Mass Production
http://www.technologyreview.com/view/519166/chinese-research…5-minutes/

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  • Sankaravelyudhan Nandakumar on November 23, 2013 6:35 pm

    Lunar surface forming a variable refractive index based on the frequency selective inclination of solar rays.

    Negative magnetic material on lunar surface is frequency selective.

    Negative materials are nevertheless easy to find. Materials with ε negative include metals (e.g., silver, gold,aluminum) at optical frequencies, while materials with negative include resonant ferromagnetic orantiferromagnetic systems silicon dioxide, also known as silica, the primary component of sand, glass, and concrete. Broken down by element, about 43% of lunar soil is oxygen, 21% silicon, 13% iron, 8% calcium, 6% aluminum, 5% magnesium, and 4% other elements Cavities in rock crystal are called “negative crystals”; those containing bubbles are known as two-phase inclusions, and interior ‘cracks’ appear as iridescence.

    We first need to understand what it means to have a negative ε or μ , and how it occurs in materials. The Drude-Lorentz model of a material is a good starting point, as it conceptually replaces the atoms and molecules of a real material by a set of harmonically bound electron oscillators, resonant at some frequency ω0 . At frequencies far below ω0 , an applied electric field displaces the electrons from the positive core, inducing a polarization in the same direction as the applied electric field. At frequencies near the resonance, the induced polarization becomes very large, as is typically the case in resonance phenomena; the large response represents accumulation of energy over many cycles, such that a considerable amount of energy is stored in the resonator (medium) relative to the driving field. So large is this stored energy that even changing the sign of the applied electric field has little effect on the polarization near resonance! That is, as the frequency of the driving electric field is swept through the resonance, the polarization flips from in-phase to out-of-phase with the driving field and the material exhibits a negative response. If instead of electrons the material response were due to harmonically bound magnetic moments, then a negative magnetic response.

    That negative material parameters occur near a resonance has two important consequences. First, negative material parameters will exhibit frequency dispersion: that is to say they will vary as a function of frequency. Second, the usable bandwidth of negative materials will be relatively narrow compared with positive materials. This can help us answer our initial question as to why materials with both negative ε and μ are not readily found. The resonances in existing materials that give rise to electric polarizations typically occur at very high frequencies, in the optical, for metals, or at least in the THz to infrared region for semiconductors and insulators. On the other hand, resonances in magnetic systems typically occur at much lower frequencies, usually tailing off toward the THz and infrared region. In short, the fundamental electronic and magnetic processes that give rise to resonant phenomena in materials simply do not occur at the same frequencies, although no physical law would preclude this.

    An interesting question arises if there is absorption in the system represented by positive imaginary parts of either or both of ε and μ . Conditions for the theorem may still be satisfied but require that for every instance of a positive part to ε,μ there is a mirror antisymmetric negative ε,μ somewhere else in the system. This implies that parts of the system must exhibit gain. Loss can only be compensated by active amplification.
    At frequencies above ω0 and below ωp , the permittivity is negative and, because the resonant frequency can be set to virtually any value in a metamaterial, phenomena usually associated with optical frequencies—including negative ε —can be reproduced at low frequencies., the path to achieving Electrons emit light over a broad spectrum of wavelengths when they change their direction of motion or speed.

    Sankaravelayudhan Nandakumjar, Oxford astrogeneticist

    Waxing and waning of lunar surface producing frequency based selective band width becoming negative refractive index medium with refractio9n and amplification as focal length becomes a curvature as f=R/1-n .This gives a clue that along the plane of hologram with solar rays interference the medium as lunar surface behave typically to enhance negative refractive index. The negative band width is relatively small narrow. This giver rise to electric polarisation at high frequencies and a resonance occurs at lower frequencies. A negative refractive index implies that the phase of the medium advancing will be negative and th amplification is a function of thickness varied bey the angle of incidence of solar rays.Thus the resonance frequency is determined by the geometry of lunar surface lattice. Thus the eighth cusp from new moon seems to be very important factor of increased invisible cloaking dynamics

    Sankaravelyudhan Nandakumar, Hubble research scholar http://www.hawking.org.uk
    hubblesite.org support: ISSUE=6332 P Optical Density and Light Speed Project.

  • Sankaravelyudhan Nandakumar on December 1, 2013 7:46 pm

    Lunar surface forming a variable refractive index based on the frequency selective inclination of solar rays.
    Polarization of light emitted in the presence of a magnetic field. Reversed as inductive and capacitive configution along positive and negative refractive index. As inductive and capacitive pumping of light rays as corollary to zeeman effect.
    On the lunar surface applying a magnetic field to a magnetic vortex pushes the vortex away from the center of the disk towards the frame. If one then turns the field off abruptly, the vortex moves either clockwise or counter clockwise on a spiral like trajectory back into its initial position in the center of the disk. This special movement is called gyration. In principal, the perpendicular magnetization of the vortex core can point either upwards or downwards, and four different kinds of movement can be found: right- and left rotating magnetic swirls, combined either with an up- or downward directed perpendicular core magnetization.An amplification may produce water attractive capacitive twisters with capacitive elements in series with inductive shunting in between positive and negative refractive resonance
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    Quantum mechanical twisters as inductive-capacitors at middle neutral point of electron triple pair as monopoles deals with frequency shifts-reg [Incident: 100926–000004 [email protected]

  • Sankaravelyudhan Nandakumar on December 3, 2013 10:09 pm

    Tractor bessel beam with invisible clocking dynamics may be used to correct the Tole mere as capacity twister for DNA correction

    Sankaravelayudhan Nandakumar Nandakumar
    9:10 AM (0 minutes ago)

    to news, j.pendry, Ada, s.w.hawking

    Tractor wave in laser biostimulation may be used for genetic corrections using invisible cloaking dynamics combinations.
    Three twisted supercapacitors connected in series could be used toto manipulate a invisible cloaking dynamics says Sankaravelyudhan Nandakumr in addition to tractor bessel beam connected genetic ATGU language may be used to correct a genetic defect as observed in the palm print at the meeting point of health line with life line.

    An information available from Bossonova twisters may be utilised in all electronic super computers Bossonova twisters can be pushed up or down and this information could be utilise in Aerospace vehicles .The Electron by cross polarisation will act as twister by magnetic or electric field twisting may act as a capacitor says Sankaravelayudhan Nandakumar.They are really optical rogue waves by funnelling at the middle and sometimes at extereme domains for future merger and this could be utilise in our quantum entaglement teleportation in future.Electrons , pinned. as actually when an electron can behave like a sort of wave in the solid, but only an electron can stop an electron by their mutual interaction—their motion is almost freezed out. That is the essence of correlated electrons. The team was motivated by recent theoretical work which suggested that the behaviour of magnetic monopoles in momentum space is closely related to the anomalous Hall effect.This information will be utilised as extreme inductance algorithm as purely magnetic field as purely capacitive as electricfield monopoles as threseems to be shift by the mode of electron scattering such as a spirality as well as that of reflective dipole polaritons separations.digital 0,1 SQUAD applications.

    Applying a magnetic field to a magnetic vortex pushes the vortex away from the center of the disk towards the frame. If one then turns the field off abruptly, the vortex moves either clockwise or counter clockwise on a spiral like trajectory back into its initial position in the center of the disk. This special movement is called gyration. In principal, the perpendicular magnetization of the vortex core can point either upwards or downwards, and four different kinds of movement can be found: right- and left rotating magnetic swirls, combined either with an up- or downward directed perpendicular core magnetization.Super conductive materials repel magneticfield when spin oposite directions and attract when spin in the same directions which becomes the beautiful nano digital circuit.At the quantum level, the forces of magnetism and superconductivity exist in an uneasy relationship. Superconducting materials repel a magnetic field, so to create a superconducting current, the magnetic forces must be strong enough to overcome the natural repulsion and penetrate the body of the superconductor. But there’s a limit: Apply too much magnetic force, and the superconductor’s capability is destroyed
    When a magnetic field is applied to a superconducting material, vortices measured in nanometers (1 billionth of a meter) pop up. These vortices, like super-miniature tornadoes, are areas where the magnetic field has overpowered the superconducting field state, essentially suppressing it. Crank up the magnetic field and more vortices appear. At some point, the vortices are so widespread the material loses its superconducting ability altogether.But at critical stoke anstoke resonance on electron pairing at middle cross overs are amplified which seems to be an important finding.Normally the magnetic field is zero at this point ‚but sometimes this theory is broken.There seems to be a converging diverging magneticfield that resonante for such cross overs along gliding the waves fluctuated under certain cross over conditions, but when more magnetic energy is added, the fluctuations disappear and the waves resume their repeating, linear patterns.There seems to be linaer to nonlinaer dynamics at the middle point.Hence, our experts consider them as potential candidates for future non volatile magnetic memories.
    Bossonova dynamics deals with frequency shifts at microlevel nanotechnology at electron triplets.
    Experiments Unraveled Dynamic Core Movements Of Magnetic Swirls:Skew scattering related hopping observed at spin up and spin down cross resonance seems to be a very interesting phenomena — The spin polarization S( theta) n induced by the skew scattering due to the spin-orbit interaction of the scatterer and the spin unpolarized electron beam for polarization
    In March 2011, Chinese scientists posited that a specific type of Bessel beam (a special kind of laser that that does not diffract at the centre) is capable of creating a pull-like effect on a given microscopic particle, forcing it towards the beam source.[31][32] The underlining physics is the maximization of forward scattering via interference of the radiation multipoles. They show explicitly that the necessary condition to realize a negative (pulling) optical force is the simultaneous excitation of multipoles in the particle and if the projection of the total photon momentum along the propagation direction is small, attractive optical force is possible.[33] The Chinese scientists suggest this possibility may be implemented for optical micromanipulation.
    Applying a magnetic field to a magnetic vortex pushes the vortex away from the center of the disk towards the frame. If one then turns the field off abruptly, the vortex moves either clockwise or counter clockwise on a spiral like trajectory back into its initial position in the center of the disk. This special movement is called gyration. In principal, the perpendicular magnetization of the vortex core can point either upwards or downwards, and four different kinds of movement can be found: right- and left rotating magnetic swirls, combined either with an up- or downward directed perpendicular core magnetization.
    Sankaravelyudhan Nandakumar ‚Astro geneticist
    [email protected]
    Sankaravelyudhan Nandakumar,Hubble research scholar http://www.hawking.org.uk
    [email protected]

  • Sankaravelyudhan Nandakumar on February 2, 2014 8:16 pm

    Single-Molecule Unfolding Force Distributions Reveal a Funnel-Shaped Energy Landscape
    Every human cell is surrounded by a plasma membrane, a phospholipid bilayer. The membrane makes it possible for the cell to maintain a specific mix of biochemically active species, while preventing unwanted entry of other substances from the outside environment. For proper function, the biochemical machinery inside a cell needs to be able to receive instructions from the outside. But somehow solar magnetic field emissions of bosonic-fermion mixture are capable of forming certain gravity oriented affine dynamics in course of time.
    The protein folding process is described as diffusion on a high-dimensional energy landscape. Experimental data showing details of the underlying energy surface are essential to understanding folding. So far in single-molecule mechanical unfolding experiments a simplified model assuming a force-independent transition state has been used to extract such information. Here we show that this so-called Bell model, although fitting well to force velocity data, fails to reproduce full unfolding force distributions. We show that by applying Kramers diffusion model, we were able to reconstruct a detailed funnel-like curvature of the underlying energy landscape and establish full agreement with the data. We demonstrate that obtaining spatially resolved details of the unfolding energy landscape from mechanical single-molecule protein unfolding experiments requires models that go beyond the Bell model.
    Lucy Christiana, Lady Duff Gordon (Mrs Morgan born on 13 June) (née Sutherland) Palm print of showed a protective square at the end of travel line a mark of protection from catastrophic drowning over lapping the water affined criticality from cancer whereas W.T.Stead was drowned being born in July 16. who had a cross at the end of travel line at lunar mount
    Single-Molecule Unfolding Force Distributions Reveal a Funnel-Shaped Energy Landscape in Telomerase –reg
    Single-Molecule Unfolding Force Distributions Reveal a Funnel-Shaped Energy Landscape in Telomerase Symmetry breaking dynamics
    The protein folding process is described as diffusion on a high-dimensional energy landscape. Experimental data showing details of the underlying energy surface are essential to understanding folding. So far in single-molecule mechanical unfolding experiments a simplified model assuming a force-independent transition state has been used to extract such information. Here we show that this so-called Bell model, although fitting well to force velocity data, fails to reproduce full unfolding force distributions. We show that by applying Kramers diffusion model, we were able to reconstruct a detailed funnel-like curvature of the underlying energy landscape and establish full agreement with the data. We demonstrate that obtaining spatially resolved details of the unfolding energy landscape from mechanical single-molecule protein unfolding experiments requires models that go beyond the Bell model.
    Funnelling protein folding related Telomerase symmetry breaking dynamics evolved:
    Oxford astrogenetics dept with Sankaarbvelayudhan nandakumar as team member along with President of Royal astronomical society have found out some interesting solitonic vortices in Tolemerase may be responsible for symmetry breaking cross polarised dynamics.A new protein folding strain that can be evalauted at the strain cross over points that deal with sudden reversal dynamics at middle point Knee Frequency hopping in between the shortening and expanding Telomerase that act like aspring deals with protein processing .This failure related upward and downward force in fact initiate a shearing force at the breaking pointas skew matrics scattering.The protein folding process is described as diffusion on a high-dimensional energy landscape is understandable via cross polarised resonating dipolar magnetic field acting as an inductive that resonate for vortices Experimental data showing details of the underlying energy surface are essential to understanding Tolemerase folding leading to cancerous cells. So far in single-molecule mechanical unfolding experiments a simplified model assuming a force-independent transition state has been used to extract such information. Here we show that this so-called Bell model, although fitting well to force velocity data, fails to reproduce full unfolding force distributions. We show that by applying Kramers diffusion model, we were able to reconstruct a detailed funnel-like curvature of the underlying energy landscape and establish full agreement with the data. We demonstrate that obtaining spatially resolved details of the unfolding energy landscape from mechanical single-molecule protein unfolding experiments requires models that go beyond the Bell model.
    This in a way decoded the graphical interpretation of dual frequency resonance involved by dipole resonance at the in middle frequency reversal and forward oscillations involved in quantum entanglement involved in pie dynamics , of Telomerase revealing the basic Astrogenetic theory involved. It is suspected that lunar waves simulate a cross polarised dynamics Telomerase dynamics that deal with cancerous growth.
    The amplitude shaping involves a dual Gaussian amplitude grating creating antistoke wp and Stokes ws bands, while the pie phase shaping involves a narrow pie-phase gate located at the center of Telomerase band responsible for such symmetry breaking.
    Coherent Raman scattering, in which molecular vibrations are driven coherently through stimulated excitation by laser beams, offers new possibilities for ultra sensitive detection due to the greatly amplified signal strength.[, which is the most popular technique among the coherent Raman scattering family, the beating between a pump (at wp) and a Stokes (atws) beam actively drives the molecular oscillators at the difference frequency wp_ ws. Under their joint action, a vibrational coherence, a coherent superposition between the ground state and the excited vibrational state, is created among different molecules throughout the sample. Through a further interaction with wp, this vibrational coherence can be converted pulse (e.g. 10 fs pulse duration) excites more non-resonant background than resonant signal, as the electronic resonance is largely detuned for much of the broadband wp and was components.
    Second, phase shaping could allow the identification of narrowband Raman spectral signature in the fingerprint region through spectral interferometry. Without this, Raman spectral information would be masked by the broadband excitation required by the above bandwidth matching condition. Therefore, the combination of amplitude and phase shaping gives rise to both detection sensitivity and spectral specificity.
    The opposing stoke and antistoke of lower frequency ‚middle frequency, and higher frequency entanglement could be used to amplify the output energy in erratic cancerous cell growth in understanding the magnetic field vortices that glide over the middle squeezing point of Telomarase.This resonance act as converging and diverging nozzle dynamics towards a breaking point dipole .
    An observation of cross at the
    end of palm print indiacte a real cross polarised middle frequency dynamics of Telomerase which call for an interesting water affined genetic constraints even though the meeting point of health line with life line indicate a catastrophic influence.
    Sankara velayudhan Nandakumar,Oxford Astrogeneticist

    Single-Molecule Unfolding Force Distributions Reveal a Funnel-Shaped Energy Landscape in Telomerase –reg [Incident: 101001–000006 “[email protected]

    Bossonova fermion cancer magnetic-field resonance calls for catastrophic water affine telomeres protein gravity funneling of cross graphics e [Incident: 140130–000009] [email protected] hubblesite.org support: ISSUE=6794 PROJ=13
    Your recent email to Professor Hawking [email protected]

  • Sankaravelyudhan Nandakumar on February 4, 2014 7:16 pm

    Internal cold flow web sites of mass flow of hydrogen in space
    Astronomers have long theorized that larger galaxies could receive a constant influx of cold hydrogen by siphoning it off other less-massive companions. a cold flow, though there is another probable explanation for what has been observed. It’s also possible that sometime in the past this galaxy had a close encounter and passed by its neighbors, leaving a ribbon of neutral atomic hydrogen in its wake. If that were the case, however, there should be a small but observable population of stars in the filaments. Further studies will help to confirm the nature of this observation and could shine light on the possible role that cold flows play in the evolution of galaxies. rapid increases in such a star’s pulsation frequency, as this may be due to vortex interactions inside the star dealing with cold flow of hydrogen
    nternal cold flow web sites of mass flow of hydrogen in space