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Archive for the ‘bioprinting’ category

Jul 23, 2021

Rapid new bioprinting method unlocks potential of human tissue transplants

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioprinting, biotech/medical

Scientists from the University at Buffalo have developed a rapid new 3D bioprinting method that could represent a significant step towards fully-printed human organs.

Using a novel vat-SLA-based approach, the team have been able to reduce the time it takes to create cell-laden hydrogel structures, from over 6 hours to just 19 minutes. The expedited biofabrication method also enables the production of embedded blood vessel networks, potentially making it a significant step towards the lifesaving 3D printed organs needed by those on transplant waiting lists.

“Our method allows for the rapid printing of centimeter-sized hydrogel models,” explained the study’s lead co-author, Chi Zhou. “It significantly reduces part deformation and cellular injuries caused by the prolonged exposure to the environmental stresses you commonly see in conventional 3D printing.”

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Jul 23, 2021

Volumetric Bioprinting of Complex Living‐Tissue Constructs within Seconds

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, bioprinting, biotech/medical, life extension, robotics/AI

Bioprinting in seconds.


Biofabrication technologies, including stereolithography and extrusion-based printing, are revolutionizing the creation of complex engineered tissues. The current paradigm in bioprinting relies on the additive layer-by-layer deposition and assembly of repetitive building blocks, typically cell-laden hydrogel fibers or voxels, single cells, or cellular aggregates. The scalability of these additive manufacturing technologies is limited by their printing velocity, as lengthy biofabrication processes impair cell functionality. Overcoming such limitations, the volumetric bioprinting of clinically relevant sized, anatomically shaped constructs, in a time frame ranging from seconds to tens of seconds is described. An optical-tomography-inspired printing approach, based on visible light projection, is developed to generate cell-laden tissue constructs with high viability (85%) from gelatin-based photoresponsive hydrogels. Free-form architectures, difficult to reproduce with conventional printing, are obtained, including anatomically correct trabecular bone models with embedded angiogenic sprouts and meniscal grafts. The latter undergoes maturation in vitro as the bioprinted chondroprogenitor cells synthesize neo-fibrocartilage matrix. Moreover, free-floating structures are generated, as demonstrated by printing functional hydrogel-based ball-and-cage fluidic valves. Volumetric bioprinting permits the creation of geometrically complex, centimeter-scale constructs at an unprecedented printing velocity, opening new avenues for upscaling the production of hydrogel-based constructs and for their application in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and soft robotics.

Jun 15, 2021

Readily3D develops 3D bioprinted mini pancreas for diabetes drug testing

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioprinting, biotech/medical

Volumetric 3D bioprinter manufacturer and EPFL spin-out Readily3D has taken the first step towards developing a 3D printed living model of the human pancreas for testing diabetes medicines.

Readily3D’s novel technology is being deployed within the EU-funded Enlight project and is reportedly capable of 3D printing a biological tissue containing human stem cells in just 30 seconds.

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Jun 15, 2021

3D bioprinted heart provides new tool for surgeons

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioprinting, biotech/medical, engineering

Circa 2020


The FRESH technique of 3D bioprinting was invented in Feinberg’s lab to fill an unfilled demand for 3D printed soft polymers, which lack the rigidity to stand unsupported as in a normal print. FRESH 3D printing uses a needle to inject bioink into a bath of soft hydrogel, which supports the object as it prints. Once finished, a simple application of heat causes the hydrogel to melt away, leaving only the 3D bioprinted object.

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May 26, 2021

Mars Research | Artificial Muscle

Posted by in categories: bioprinting, cyborgs, Elon Musk, robotics/AI, space

😃


✅ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/pro_robots.

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Apr 28, 2021

Skin and bones repaired by bioprinting during surgery

Posted by in categories: bioprinting, biotech/medical, engineering

Fixing traumatic injuries to the skin and bones of the face and skull is difficult because of the many layers of different types of tissues involved, but now, researchers have repaired such defects in a rat model using bioprinting during surgery, and their work may lead to faster and better methods of healing skin and bones.

“This work is clinically significant,” said Ibrahim T. Ozbolat, Hartz Family Career Development Associate Professor of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Biomedical Engineering and Neurosurgery, Penn State. “Dealing with composite defects, fixing hard and at once, is difficult. And for the craniofacial area, the results have to be esthetically pleasing.”

Currently, fixing a hole in the skull involving both and soft tissue requires using bone from another part of the patient’s body or a cadaver. The bone must be covered by soft tissue with , also harvested from somewhere else, or the bone will die. Then surgeons need to repair the soft tissue and skin.

Feb 23, 2021

Human Body 2.0 Project

Posted by in categories: bioprinting, biotech/medical

Table of Contents.

As of 2015940 million people suffer from a form of visual impairment. Today, some forms of blindness can be cured by cornea implants and other procedures. Other forms of blindness like glaucoma (where the issue is related to the optic nerve) are beyond our abilities to fix. Despite advances in bioprinting and camera miniaturization, the issue of optical connection remains when attempting to replace the human eye. So far, technological progress has largely not risen to the challenge that 2.0 poises.

Feb 10, 2021

Israeli Farm Cultivates Lab-Grown Ribeye Steak Using 3D Printing

Posted by in categories: bioprinting, food, sustainability

Three-dimensional “bio-printing” and real cow cells — an achievement that’s prompting the Israeli startup to eye other meat…The firm’s technology prints living cells that are incubated to grow, differentiate and interact to acquire the texture and qualities of a real steak. “It incorporates muscle and fat similar to its slaughtered counterpart,” Aleph Farms said, adding that the product boasts the same attributes “of a delicious tender, juicy ribeye steak you’d buy from the butcher.”

Jan 25, 2021

Scientists use a novel ink to 3D print bone with living cells

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioprinting, biotech/medical, chemistry

Scientists from UNSW Sydney have developed a ceramic-based ink that may allow surgeons in the future to 3D-print bone parts complete with living cells that could be used to repair damaged bone tissue.

Using a 3D-printer that deploys a special ink made up of calcium phosphate, the scientists developed a new technique, known as ceramic omnidirectional bioprinting in cell-suspensions (COBICS), enabling them to print -like structures that harden in a matter of minutes when placed in water.

While the idea of 3D-printing bone-mimicking structures is not new, this is the first time such material can be created at room temperature—complete with living cells—and without harsh chemicals or radiation, says Dr. Iman Roohani from UNSW’s School of Chemistry.

Dec 16, 2020

Researchers develop new method to print tiny, functional organs

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, bioprinting, biotech/medical, neuroscience

Researchers at EPFL have developed an approach to print tiny tissues that look and function almost like their full-sized counterpart. Measuring just a few centimeters across, the mini-tissues could allow scientists to study biological processes—and even test new treatment approaches—in ways that were previously not possible.

For years, mini versions of organs such as the brain, kidney and lung—known as “organoids”—have been grown from . Organoids promise to cut down on the need for and offer better models to study how human organs form and how that process goes awry in disease. However, conventional approaches to grow organoids result in stem cells assembling into micro-to millimeter-sized, hollow spheres. “That is non-physiological, because many organs, such as the intestine or the airway, are tube-shaped and much larger,” says Matthias Lütolf, a professor at EPFL’s Institute of Bioengineering, who led the study published today in Nature Materials.

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