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Archive for the ‘computing’ category

Jul 7, 2019

Voracious Black Holes Could Feed Alien Life on Rogue Worlds

Posted by in categories: alien life, computing

O.o…


Black holes are engines of destruction on a cosmic scale, but they may also be the bringers of life. New research on supermassive black holes suggests that the radiation they emit during feeding frenzies can create biomolecular building blocks and even power photosynthesis.

The upshot? Far more worlds roaming the Milky Way and beyond could be suitable to life, the researchers speculated.

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Jul 3, 2019

Physicists use light waves to accelerate supercurrents, enable ultrafast quantum computing

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Jigang Wang and his collaborators have demonstrated light-induced acceleration of supercurrents, which could enable practical applications of quantum mechanics such as computing, sensing and communicating. Larger image. Image courtesy of Jigang Wang.

AMES, Iowa – Jigang Wang patiently explained his latest discovery in quantum control that could lead to superfast computing based on quantum mechanics: He mentioned light-induced superconductivity without energy gap. He brought up forbidden supercurrent quantum beats. And he mentioned terahertz-speed symmetry breaking.

Jul 2, 2019

Physicists developed an interface for quantum computers

Posted by in categories: computing, internet, quantum physics

Quantum physics will bring us even faster computers and tap-proof communication. However, there are still a number of problems to solve before the breakthrough. The prototype of a quantum interface, which was developed at the Institute for Science and Technology (IST) Austria, brings us one step closer to quantum internet. The transfer of information from one quantum computer to another becomes possible.

One problem with quantum computers is that the electronics only function at extremely low temperatures of a few thousands of a degree above absolute zero (−273.15 °C). If the temperature in the computer rises, all information is destroyed. The reason for this is superconductivity – a macroscopic quantum state of materials whose electrical resistance drops abruptly to zero when the temperature drops below the transition temperature. In the case of the quantum computer, these are microwave photons that are extremely sensitive to noise and losses.

This temperature sensitivity currently makes it almost impossible to transfer information from one quantum computer to another. The information would have to pass through an environment with high temperatures it could not survive in.

Jul 1, 2019

How Big Is the Gap Between ‘Ready Player One’ and Current VR Tech?

Posted by in categories: computing, virtual reality

Where reality is still lagging considerably is in recreating the physical experience of VR. In the movie, the haptic gloves OASIS players wear make them virtual objects almost indistinguishable from real ones. Other characters have even more advanced set-ups, like full-body haptic suits that simulate both pleasure and pain, complicated harnesses and treadmills that allow users to run around and move their bodies just like they would in real life, and even “smell towers.”

But a report released by analysts IDTechX to coincide with the movie’s release suggests the first step towards most of these technologies has already been taken. VR handsets already feature the same kind of rumble packs found in computer game controllers that provide simple haptic feedback in the form of vibrations.

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Jul 1, 2019

Theoretical physicists unveil one of the most ubiquitous and elusive concepts in chemistry

Posted by in categories: chemistry, computing, particle physics, quantum physics

Oxidation numbers have so far eluded any rigorous quantum mechanical definition. A new SISSA study, published in Nature Physics, provides such a definition based on the theory of topological quantum numbers, which was honored with the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics, awarded to Thouless, Haldane and Kosterlitz. This result, combined with recent advances in the theory of transport achieved at SISSA, paves the way to an accurate, yet tractable, numerical simulation of a broad class of materials that are important in energy-related technologies and planetary sciences.

Every undergraduate student in the natural sciences learns how to associate an integer oxidation number to a chemical species participating in a reaction. Unfortunately, the very concept of oxidation state has thus far eluded a rigorous quantum mechanical definition, so that no method was known until now to compute oxidation numbers from the fundamental laws of nature, let alone demonstrate that their use in the simulation of charge transport does not spoil the quality of numerical simulations. At the same time, the evaluation of electric currents in ionic conductors, which is required to model their transport properties, is presently based on a cumbersome quantum-mechanical approach that severely limits the feasibility of large-scale computer simulations. Scientists have lately noticed that a simplified model where each atom carries a charge equal to its oxidation number may give results in surprising good agreement with rigorous but much more expensive approaches.

Jul 1, 2019

Solving a condensation mystery

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, sustainability

Condensation might ruin a wood coffee table or fog up glasses when entering a warm building on a winter day, but it’s not all inconveniences; the condensation and evaporation cycle has important applications.

Water can be harvested from “thin air,” or separated from salt in desalination plants by way of . Due to the fact condensing take heat with them when they evaporate, it’s also part of the cooling process in the industrial and high-powered computing arenas. Yet when researchers took a look at the newest method of condensation, they saw something strange: When a special type of is covered in a thin layer of oil, condensed water droplets seemed to be randomly flying across the surface at high velocities, merging with larger droplets, in patterns not caused by gravity.

“They’re so far apart, in terms of their own, relative dimensions”—the droplets have a diameter smaller than 50 micrometers—” and yet they’re getting pulled, and moving at really high velocities,” said Patricia Weisensee, assistant professor of mechanical engineering & materials science in the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis.

Jul 1, 2019

In 15 years we’ll be able to upload education to our brains. So can I stop saving for my kids’ college?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, drones, education, neuroscience, transhumanism

I’m super excited to share this new Quartz article of mine, part of an ongoing personal debate about #transhumanism, #kids, and #education in my family:


But the age of downloading experience and expertise directly into our brain mainframe is coming. So is downloading professional training, including everything from becoming a police officer to practicing medicine or investigative journalism.

For many in the audience, I think that was the first time considering this could become a reality in our lifetime.

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Jul 1, 2019

How to Turn a Quantum Computer Into the Ultimate Randomness Generator

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Pure, verifiable randomness is hard to come by. Two proposals show how to make quantum computers into randomness factories.

Jun 30, 2019

‘Near’ Infinite Data Compression Possible

Posted by in category: computing

Student from Canberra, Australia confirms that ‘near’ infinite data compression is possible.

Has proven that ‘near’ infinite compression of data is possible. Can shrink Terabytes of data to under 1440KB.Could technically store known, or ‘explored’, universe in an object smaller than a grapefruit.

  • (Smaller than a grapefruit seed in fact!).
  • How close to ‘zero’ (infinite) can you get?, much smaller than 1440KB he’ll say that much.

Jun 30, 2019

Google Is 2 Billion Lines of Code—And It’s All in One Place

Posted by in category: computing

Circa 2015


By comparison, Microsoft Windows—one of the most complex software tools ever built for a single computer—is about 50 million lines.

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