БЛОГ

Archive for the ‘engineering’ category

May 25, 2024

Researchers identify best algorithms to optimize performance of functionally graded materials

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, information science

A study from Japan published in the International Journal of Computer Aided Engineering and Technology reveals a way to optimize the composition of functionally graded materials (FGMs). FGMs are advanced composite materials with a gradual variation in composition and properties across their volume, designed to optimize performance under specific loading conditions.

May 25, 2024

Dyson Spheres: Astronomers Report Potential Candidates for Alien Megastructures—Here’s What to Make of It

Posted by in categories: alien life, engineering

There are three ways to look for evidence of alien technological civilizations. One is to look out for deliberate attempts by them to communicate their existence, for example, through radio broadcasts. Another is to look for evidence of them visiting the solar system. And a third option is to look for signs of large-scale engineering projects in space.

A team of astronomers have taken the third approach by searching through recent astronomical survey data to identify seven candidates for alien megastructures, known as Dyson spheres, “deserving of further analysis.”

This is a detailed study looking for “oddballs” among stars—objects that might be alien megastructures. However, the authors are careful not to make any overblown claims. The seven objects, all located within 1,000 light-years of Earth, are “M-dwarfs”—a class of stars that are smaller and less bright than the sun.

May 25, 2024

New study offers a cleaner path for controlling water, transforming greenhouse gases

Posted by in categories: chemistry, engineering, sustainability

Scientists looking to convert carbon dioxide into clean fuels and useful chemicals often make hydrogen gas and carbonates as unwanted byproducts. A new paper from the UChicago Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering has found a cleaner path.

May 23, 2024

UChicago scientist seeks to make plastic more recyclable

Posted by in categories: engineering, materials

Editor’s note: This story is part of ‘Meet a UChicagoan,’ a regular series focusing on the people who make UChicago a distinct intellectual community. Read about the others here.

When asked to explain the difference between recyclable plastics, Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering graduate student Sam Marsden pulled out a paperclip chain and a length of small strings crudely knotted together.

The paperclip chain represented a highly recyclable plastic like the polyethylene terephthalate, or PET, found in soda bottles and the fibers in clothes. These can be broken down to the molecular level—ie., the individual paperclips—and rebuilt into like-new materials.

May 21, 2024

Functionalization of Polymer Networks for Diverse Applications

Posted by in categories: chemistry, computing, engineering, internet

While silicon has been the go-to material for sensor applications, could polymer be used as a suitable substitute since silicon has always lacked flexibility to be used in specific applications? This is what a recent grant from the National Science Foundation hopes to address, as Dr. Elsa Reichmanis of Lehigh University was recently awarded $550,000 to investigate how polymers could potentially be used as semiconductors for sensor applications, including Internet of Things, healthcare, and environmental applications.

Illustration of an organic electrochemical transistor that could be developed as a result of this research. (Credit: Illustration by by Ella Marushchenko; Courtesy of Reichmanis Research Group)

“We’ll be creating the polymers that could be the building blocks of future sensors,” said Dr. Reichmanis, who is an Anderson Chair in Chemical Engineering in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Lehigh University. “The systems we’re looking at have the ability to interact with ions and transport ionic charges, and in the right environment, conduct electronic charges.”

May 21, 2024

Discovery and engineering of Tsp2Cas9 for genome editing

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, engineering

Mao, H., Tian, Y., Wang, Z. et al. Discovery and engineering of Tsp2Cas9 for genome editing. Cell Discov 10, 55 (2024). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41421-024-00685-w.

Download citation.

May 21, 2024

New quantum dot approach can enhance electrical conductivity of solar cells

Posted by in categories: engineering, quantum physics, solar power, sustainability

A team led by Professor Jongmin Choi of the Department of Energy Science and Engineering has developed a PbS quantum dot that can rapidly enhance the electrical conductivity of solar cells. The findings are published in the journal Small.

May 20, 2024

Dr Roland Roesch — Director, Innovation and Technology Centre, International Renewable Energy Agency

Posted by in categories: business, climatology, economics, engineering, finance, policy, sustainability

Innovation For A Sustainable Global Energy Transformation — Dr. Roland Roesch, Ph.D. — Director, Innovation and Technology Centre, International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)


Dr. Roland Roesch, Ph.D. is Director, Innovation and Technology Centre (IITC), of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA — https://www.irena.org/) where he oversees the Agency’s work on advising member countries in the area of technology status and roadmaps, energy planning, cost and markets and innovation policy frameworks.

Continue reading “Dr Roland Roesch — Director, Innovation and Technology Centre, International Renewable Energy Agency” »

May 19, 2024

Coal fly ash helps cut cement content by half in low-carbon concrete

Posted by in categories: engineering, materials

Concrete beams made using fly ash and pond ash in low-carbon concrete mix met Australian standards for engineering.

May 17, 2024

Deep-sea sponge’s ‘zero-energy’ flow control could inspire new energy efficient designs

Posted by in categories: chemistry, computing, engineering, space

Now, new research reveals yet another engineering feat of this ancient animal’s structure: its ability to filter feed using only the faint ambient currents of the ocean depths, no pumping required.

This discovery of natural ‘“zero energy” control by an international research team co-led by University of Rome Tor Vergata and NYU Tandon School of Engineering could help engineers design more efficient chemical reactors, air purification systems, heat exchangers, hydraulic systems, and aerodynamic surfaces.

In a study published in Physical Review Letters, the team found through extremely high-resolution how the skeletal structure of the Venus flower basket sponge (Euplectella aspergillum) diverts very slow deep sea currents to flow upwards into its central body cavity, so it can feed on plankton and other marine detritus it filters out of the water.

Page 1 of 24412345678Last