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Archive for the ‘governance’ category

Oct 11, 2020

Japan : Future floating sustainable cities

Posted by in categories: governance, sustainability

A future man-made, self sufficient floating city to be called green floats or botanical cities is dreamt by Shimizu Corp., a Japanese firm working with State University of New York (SUNY) Polytechnic Institute.


Asia Green Buildings.

Oct 6, 2020

We are approaching the fastest, deepest, most consequential technological disruption in history

Posted by in categories: economics, energy, food, governance, sex, transportation

The next decade is going to be a transforming decade as many many technologies (some of which we all like to share in this group) are converging and maturing enough to rearrange our society in almost any aspect we can conceive.

I’m calling to those who are interested in creating and implementing an alternative model for the current social and governance systems, let’s build an open state that we can all support and trust regardless of our age, sex, geographical location, or belief system.

In the next 10 years, key technologies will converge to completely disrupt the five foundational sectors—information, energy, food, transportation, and materials—that underpin our global economy. We need to make sure the disruption benefits everyone.

Continue reading “We are approaching the fastest, deepest, most consequential technological disruption in history” »

Sep 9, 2020

Blockchain-powered ‘Smart Brain’ to govern China’s new ‘Aerospace City’

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, governance, government, information science, robotics/AI, satellites

Singapore-based blockchain data firm CyberVein has become one of 12 firms participating in the construction of China’s Hainan Wenchang International Aerospace City. Construction commenced last month, with the site previously hosting a satellite launch center. Described as “China’s first aerospace cultural and tourism city,” it will be a hub for the development of aerospace products and support services intended for use in Chinese spacecraft and satellite launch missions. The 12-million-square-meter facility will host the country’s first aerospace super-computing center, and will focus on developing 40 technological areas including big data, satellite remote sensing and high precision positioning technology. CyberVein will work alongside major Chinese firms, including Fortune 500 companies Huawei and Kingsoft Cloud, and will leverage its blockchain, artificial intelligence and big data technologies to support the development of the city’s Smart Brain Planning and Design Institute.”


Blockchain firm CyberVein is partnering with the Chinese government to build a blockchain-powered governance system for its aerospace ‘smart city.’

Listen to article.

Continue reading “Blockchain-powered ‘Smart Brain’ to govern China’s new ‘Aerospace City’” »

Jun 1, 2020

Regulating the rise of Artificial General Intelligence

Posted by in categories: governance, robotics/AI

If you are interested in artificial general intelligence (AGI), then I have a panel discussion to recommend. My friend, David Wood, has done a masterful job of selecting three panelists with deep insight into possible regulation of AGI. One of the panelists was my friend, Dan Faggella, who was eloquent and informative as usual. For this session of the London Futurists, David Wood selected two other panelists with significantly different opinions on how to properly restrain AGI.


As research around the world proceeds to improve the power, the scope, and the generality of AI systems, should developers adopt regulatory frameworks to help steer progress?

Continue reading “Regulating the rise of Artificial General Intelligence” »

Apr 2, 2020

Homo Deus author has pandemic lessons from past and warnings for future

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, governance, privacy, surveillance

Historian Yuval Harari, author of Sapiens and Homo Deus, answers questions from the South China Morning Post on how the coronavirus pandemic poses unprecedented challenges in biometric surveillance, governance and global cooperation.


Yuval Harari says that unlike our ancestors battling plagues, we have science, wisdom and community on our side.

Continue reading “Homo Deus author has pandemic lessons from past and warnings for future” »

Mar 30, 2020

Singapore could have a floating city to house 50,000 people

Posted by in categories: governance, habitats

Singapore’s floating city could be real in 10 years.

Do you feel like Singapore is getting more crowded by the day? Apartment blocks are rising quickly everywhere, yet securing a home is still difficult for many.

Our land shortage problem is an age-old conundrum and having taller buildings isn’t going to help much anymore.

Mar 1, 2020

Venn and the art of avoiding a parallel governance universe

Posted by in categories: cosmology, governance

Boards and management teams can easily find themselves either stepping on each other’s toes – or, conversely, functioning in parallel universes. So how do you find the perfect balance? Top tips on achieving a Venn-like state from Patrick Dunne – a serial social entrepreneur, chair of the EY foundation and the author of a new book on governance.

Feb 8, 2020

Ireland — World’s First “Age Friendly” Country by World Health Organization (WHO) Network — Catherine McGuigan, National Program Lead, Age Friendly Ireland — ideaXme — Ira Pastor

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biotech/medical, economics, finance, genetics, geopolitics, governance, health, life extension

Feb 1, 2020

Setting the agenda for social science research on the human microbiome

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, governance, health, policy, science

The human microbiome is an important emergent area of cross, multi and transdisciplinary study. The complexity of this topic leads to conflicting narratives and regulatory challenges. It raises questions about the benefits of its commercialisation and drives debates about alternative models for engaging with its publics, patients and other potential beneficiaries. The social sciences and the humanities have begun to explore the microbiome as an object of empirical study and as an opportunity for theoretical innovation. They can play an important role in facilitating the development of research that is socially relevant, that incorporates cultural norms and expectations around microbes and that investigates how social and biological lives intersect. This is a propitious moment to establish lines of collaboration in the study of the microbiome that incorporate the concerns and capabilities of the social sciences and the humanities together with those of the natural sciences and relevant stakeholders outside academia. This paper presents an agenda for the engagement of the social sciences with microbiome research and its implications for public policy and social change. Our methods were informed by existing multidisciplinary science-policy agenda-setting exercises. We recruited 36 academics and stakeholders and asked them to produce a list of important questions about the microbiome that were in need of further social science research. We refined this initial list into an agenda of 32 questions and organised them into eight themes that both complement and extend existing research trajectories. This agenda was further developed through a structured workshop where 21 of our participants refined the agenda and reflected on the challenges and the limitations of the exercise itself. The agenda identifies the need for research that addresses the implications of the human microbiome for human health, public health, public and private sector research and notions of self and identity. It also suggests new lines of research sensitive to the complexity and heterogeneity of human–microbiome relations, and how these intersect with questions of environmental governance, social and spatial inequality and public engagement with science.

Jan 30, 2020

Rare ‘floating city’ deep-sea creature caught on camera by stunned scientists

Posted by in categories: electronics, governance

A creature so rare that it has only a few recorded sightings across the world has been caught on camera by stunned scientists.

The benthic siphonophore, which looks like a single animal, is actually a “floating city” of many smaller organisms working together.

The creatures are so rarely seen that their ecology is almost unknown, though they are thought to make their home at depths of up to 3000m.

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