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Archive for the ‘privacy’ category

Jul 14, 2022

A deep learning technique to generate DSN amplification attacks

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, information science, privacy, robotics/AI

Deep learning techniques have recently proved to be highly promising for detecting cybersecurity attacks and determining their nature. Concurrently, many cybercriminals have been devising new attacks aimed at interfering with the functioning of various deep learning tools, including those for image classification and natural language processing.

Perhaps the most common among these attacks are adversarial attacks, which are designed to “fool” deep learning algorithms using data that has been modified, prompting them to classify it incorrectly. This can lead to the malfunctioning of many applications, , and other technologies that operate through .

Several past studies have shown the effectiveness of different adversarial attacks in prompting (DNNs) to make unreliable and false predictions. These attacks include the Carlini & Wagner attack, the Deepfool attack, the fast gradient sign method (FGSM) and the Elastic-Net attack (ENA).

Jun 24, 2022

Biometric authentication using breath

Posted by in categories: chemistry, privacy, robotics/AI, security

An artificial nose, which is combined with machine learning and built with a 16-channel sensor array was found to be able to authenticate up to 20 individuals with an average accuracy of more than 97%.

“These techniques rely on the physical uniqueness of each individual, but they are not foolproof. Physical characteristics can be copied, or even compromised by injury,” explains Chaiyanut Jirayupat, first author of the study. “Recently, human scent has been emerging as a new class of biometric authentication, essentially using your unique chemical composition to confirm who you are.”

The team turned to see if human breath could be used after finding that the skin does not produce a high enough concentration of volatile compounds for machines to detect.

Jun 22, 2022

Sniffing out your identity with breath biometrics

Posted by in categories: mobile phones, privacy, robotics/AI, security

Biometric authentication like fingerprint and iris scans are a staple of any spy movie, and trying to circumvent those security measures is often a core plot point. But these days the technology is not limited to spies, as fingerprint verification and facial recognition are now common features on many of our phones.

Now, researchers have developed a new potential odorous option for the security toolkit: your breath. In a report published in Chemical Communications, researchers from Kyushu University’s Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, in collaboration with the University of Tokyo, have developed an olfactory sensor capable of identifying individuals by analyzing the compounds in their breath.

Combined with machine learning, this “artificial nose,” built with a 16-channel sensor array, was able to authenticate up to 20 individuals with an average accuracy of more than 97%.

Jun 10, 2022

Researchers envision wood-derived, self-powered biosensors for wireless devices

Posted by in categories: mobile phones, privacy

Wood-derived materials can be used to harvest electrical energy from everyday movements such as walking, according to University of Toronto and University of Waterloo researchers.

In a new study recently published in Nano Energy, the team demonstrated the use of lignocellulosic nanofibrils—derived from —in a prototype self-powered device capable of sending a wireless signal to a smartphone via bluetooth.

Such devices can be used to track biometric data such as heart rate, oxygen levels or skin conductivity. The innovation could improve the performance of these devices while lowering their environmental impact.

Continue reading “Researchers envision wood-derived, self-powered biosensors for wireless devices” »

Mar 11, 2022

AI: Hacking without Humans How Can Human Brains Be Hacked?

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, policy, privacy, robotics/AI

Anthony J. Ferrante, Global Head of Cybersecurity and Senior Managing Director, FTI Consulting, Inc.

Artificial intelligence (AI) models are built with a type of machine learning called deep neural networks (DNNs), which are similar to neurons in the human brain. DNNs make the machine capable of mimicking human behaviors like decision making, reasoning and problem solving. This presentation will discuss the security, ethical and privacy concerns surrounding this technology. Learning Objectives:1: Understand that the solution to adversarial AI will come from a combination of technology and policy.2: Learn that coordinated efforts among key stakeholders will help to build a more secure future.3: Learn how to share intelligence information in the cybersecurity community to build strong defenses.

Mar 10, 2022

Clearview AI fined €20M for collecting Italians’ biometric data

Posted by in categories: privacy, robotics/AI

The Italian privacy guarantor (GPDP) has imposed a fine of €20,000,000 on Clearview AI for implementing a biometric monitoring network in Italy without acquiring people’s consent.

This decision resulted from a proceeding that launched in February 2021, following relevant complaints about GDPR violations that stemmed directly from Clearview’s operations.

More specifically, the investigation revealed that the American facial recognition software company maintains a database of 10 billion images of people’s faces, including Italians, who had their faces extracted from public website profiles and online videos.

Continue reading “Clearview AI fined €20M for collecting Italians’ biometric data” »

Feb 12, 2022

How will aliens contact us? Declassified NSA document reveals top theories

Posted by in categories: evolution, privacy

Jan 1, 2022

Cyclists’ biometric data could show us how to make streets safer

Posted by in categories: privacy, transportation

Rather than waiting for multiple crashes to happen at a location before intervening to improve road safety, a new study suggests we can identify dangerous areas proactively — by measuring cyclist stress levels as they navigate city streets.

The challenge: When designing a city’s transportation infrastructure, urban planners must balance the needs of drivers with the safety of pedestrians and cyclists. This is often done through surveys of local residents and best practices learned over time.

This process doesn’t always get it right, though, so sometimes cities have to install safety improvements, such as crosswalks, bike lanes, or stop lights, at dangerous intersections or stretches of road.

Jan 1, 2022

Alphabet CEO Ordered To Testify About Private Browsing Confusion On Google Chrome

Posted by in categories: law, privacy

A lawsuit filed in a California federal court in June 2020 claims that Google Chrome’s “Incognito Mode” is not as private as people think.

Now, Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai will need to answer questions over whether Google continues to track users even when they’ve activated the browser’s private browsing mode, as first reported by Bloomberg Law.

The case, Brown et al v. Google LLC, was filed on June 2, 2020, assigned to Judge Lucy H. Koh in a U.S. District Court in San Jose, California.

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Dec 23, 2021

Web 3.0 Is Coming, But Not Everyone Will Love It

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, business, cybercrime/malcode, internet, privacy, robotics/AI

Go beyond the hype.

Dubbed as the internet of tomorrow, Web 3.0 seems to be the next big thing that’s going to change our lives by fundamentally reshaping the internet.

Continue reading “Web 3.0 Is Coming, But Not Everyone Will Love It” »

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