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Archive for the ‘biological’ category

May 25, 2024

Imperceptible sensors made from ‘electronic spider silk’ can be printed directly on human skin

Posted by in categories: biological, cyborgs, sustainability, wearables

While wearable technologies with embedded sensors, such as smartwatches, are widely available, these devices can be uncomfortable, obtrusive and can inhibit the skin’s intrinsic sensations.

“If you want to accurately sense anything on a biological surface like skin or a leaf, the interface between the device and the surface is vital,” said Professor Yan Yan Shery Huang from Cambridge’s Department of Engineering, who led the research. “We also want bioelectronics that are completely imperceptible to the user, so they don’t in any way interfere with how the user interacts with the world, and we want them to be sustainable and low waste.”

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May 25, 2024

Alex Rosenberg | Intentionality, Evolution

Posted by in categories: biological, evolution, neuroscience

Alex Rosenberg is the R. Taylor Cole Professor of Philosophy at Duke University. His research focuses on the philosophy of biology and science more generally, mind, and economics.

/ friction.
/ discord.
/ frictionphilo.

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May 25, 2024

Dr. Diane DiEuliis — NDU — Preparing National Security Leaders For The Next Generation Of Threats

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biological, biotech/medical, climatology, education, health, neuroscience, policy

Episode Disclaimer — The views presented in this episode are those of the speaker and do not necessarily represent the views of the United States Department of Defense (DoD) or its components.

Dr. Diane DiEuliis, Ph.D. is a Distinguished Research Fellow at National Defense University (NDU — https://www.ndu.edu/), an institution of higher education, funded by the United States Department of Defense, aimed at facilitating high-level education, training, and professional development of national security leaders. Her research areas focus on emerging biological technologies, biodefense, and preparedness for biothreats. Specific topic areas under this broad research portfolio include dual-use life sciences research, synthetic biology, the U.S. bioeconomy, disaster recovery, and behavioral, cognitive, and social science as it relates to important aspects of deterrence. Dr. DiEuliis currently has several research grants in progress, and teaches in foundational professional military education.

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May 25, 2024

Scientists Discover Key Food Nutrients Linked to Slower Brain Aging

Posted by in categories: biological, food, life extension, neuroscience

Understanding the biological processes of getting older could help us lead longer lives, and stay healthier later in life – and a new study links the speed at which our brain ages with the nutrients in our diets.

Researchers from the University of Illinois and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln mapped brain scans against nutritional intake for 100 volunteers aged between 65 and 75, looking for connections between certain diets and slower brain aging.

They identified two distinct types of brain aging – and the slower paced aging was associated with nutrient intake similar to what you would get from the Mediterranean diet, shown in previous studies to be one of the best for our bodies.

May 24, 2024

Scientists print invisible, spider silk-like sensors directly on skin

Posted by in categories: biological, innovation

Fiber sensors conform to skin:


In another scientific marvel inspired by the wonder that is spider silk, researchers have developed an innovative method to create adaptive and eco-friendly sensors that can be seamlessly and invisibly printed onto various biological surfaces, such as a finger or a flower petal.

This breakthrough in high-performance bioelectronics allows for the customization of sensors on a wide range of surfaces, from fingertips to the delicate seedheads of dandelions, by printing them directly onto them.

May 20, 2024

Life’s Secret Ingredient? USC Scientist Discovers New “Rule of Biology”

Posted by in categories: biological, law

University of Southern California Dornsife molecular biologist John Tower suggests that while living things generally prefer stability to conserve energy and resources, instability may also play a crucial role.

A molecular biologist at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences may have found a new “rule of biology.”

A rule of biology, sometimes called a biological law, describes a recognized pattern or truism among living organisms. Allen’s rule, for example, states that among warm-blooded animals, those found in colder areas have shorter, thicker limbs (to conserve body heat) than those in hotter regions, which need more body surface area to dissipate heat.

May 20, 2024

Emulating Biology For Robots With Rolling Contact Joints

Posted by in categories: biological, robotics/AI

Joints are an essential part in robotics, especially those that try to emulate the motion of (human) animals. Unlike the average automaton, animals are not outfitted with bearings and similar types of joints, but rather rely sometimes on ball joints and a lot on rolling contact joints (RCJs). These RCJs have the advantage of being part of the skeletal structure, making them ideal for compact and small joints. This is the conclusion that [Breaking Taps] came to as well while designing the legs for a bird-like automaton.

These RCJs do not just have the surfaces which contact each other while rotating, but also provide the constraints for how far a particular joint is allowed to move, both in the forward and backward directions as well as sideways. In the case of the biological version these contact surfaces are also coated with a constantly renewing surface to prevent direct bone-on-bone contact. The use of RCJs is rather common in robotics, with the humanoid DRACO 3 platform as detailed in a 2023 research article by [Seung Hyeon Bang] and colleagues in Frontiers in Robotics and AI.

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May 20, 2024

Scientists Awaken Deep Sea Bacteria After 100 Million Years

Posted by in categories: biological, life extension

Year 2020 This holds promise for near infinite lifespans for humans still in the first stages but still very promising for immortality and so much more.


The microbes had survived on trace amounts of oxygen and were able to feed and multiply once revived in the lab.

May 19, 2024

Neuromorphic Computing: The Future of Artificial Intelligence

Posted by in categories: biological, neuroscience, robotics/AI

In the vast and ever-evolving landscape of technology, neuromorphic computing emerges as a groundbreaking frontier, reminiscent of uncharted territories awaiting exploration. This novel approach to computation, inspired by the intricate workings of the human brain, offers a path to traverse the complex terrains of artificial intelligence (AI) and advanced data processing with unprecedented efficiency and agility.

Neuromorphic computing, at its core, is an endeavor to mirror the human brain’s architecture and functionality within the realm of computer engineering. It represents a significant shift from traditional computing methods, charting a course towards a future where machines not only compute but also learn and adapt in ways that are strikingly similar to the human brain. This technology deploys artificial neurons and synapses, creating networks that process information in a manner akin to our cognitive processes. The ultimate objective is to develop systems capable of sophisticated tasks, with the agility and energy efficiency that our brain exemplifies.

The genesis of neuromorphic computing can be traced back to the late 20th century, rooted in the pioneering work of researchers who sought to bridge the gap between biological brain functions and electronic computing. The concept gained momentum in the 1980s, driven by the vision of Carver Mead, a physicist who proposed the use of analog circuits to mimic neural processes. Since then, the field has evolved, fueled by advancements in neuroscience and technology, growing from a theoretical concept to a tangible reality with vast potential.

May 19, 2024

Evolutionary Emergence: From Primordial Atoms to Living Algorithms of Artificial Superintelligence

Posted by in categories: biological, cosmology, information science, particle physics, quantum physics, robotics/AI

To be clear, humans are not the pinnacle of evolution. We are confronted with difficult choices and cannot sustain our current trajectory. No rational person can expect the human population to continue its parabolic growth of the last 200 years, along with an ever-increasing rate of natural resource extraction. This is socio-economically unsustainable. While space colonization might offer temporary relief, it won’t resolve the underlying issues. If we are to preserve our blue planet and ensure the survival and flourishing of our human-machine civilization, humans must merge with synthetic intelligence, transcend our biological limitations, and eventually evolve into superintelligent beings, independent of material substrates—advanced informational beings, or ‘infomorphs.’ In time, we will shed the human condition and upload humanity into a meticulously engineered inner cosmos of our own creation.

Much like the origin of the Universe, the nature of consciousness may appear to be a philosophical enigma that remains perpetually elusive within the current scientific paradigm. However, I emphasize the term “current.” These issues are not beyond the reach of alternative investigative methods, ones that the next scientific paradigm will inevitably incorporate with the arrival of Artificial Superintelligence.

The era of traditional, human-centric theoretical modeling and problem-solving—developing hypotheses, uncovering principles, and validating them through deduction, logic, and repeatable experimentation—may be nearing the end. A confluence of factors—Big Data, algorithms, and computational resources—are steering us towards a new type of discovery, one that transcends the limitations of human-like logic and decision-making— the one driven solely by AI superintelligence, nestled in quantum neo-empiricism and a fluidity of solutions. These novel scientific methodologies may encompass, but are not limited to, computing supercomplex abstractions, creating simulated realities, and manipulating matter-energy and the space-time continuum itself.

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