БЛОГ

Archive for the ‘food’ category

Jul 20, 2020

Review: Once Upon a Time I Lived on Mars

Posted by in categories: food, robotics/AI, space

Once Upon a Time I Lived on Mars: Space, Exploration, and Life on Earth by Kate Greene St. Martin’s Press, 2020 hardcover, 240 pp. ISBN 978−1−250−15947−2 US$27.

While the robotic missions launching to Mars this year have a wide range of science goals, they are widely seen as precursors for eventual human missions to the Red Planet. NASA’s Mars 2020 mission includes an experiment called MOXIE that will demonstrate a way to produce oxygen from the carbon dioxide in the Martian atmosphere, a capability that will be essential for future human expeditions. NASA’s fiscal year 2021 budget proposal included a request to start work on a Mars Ice Mapper mission, an orbiter that would search for subsurface ice deposits that could be resources for future human expeditions.

Much of the planning for future Mars missions is focused on various capabilities needed to safely transport humans to the surface of Mars and bring them back. But beyond technologies like in situ resource utilization and supersonic retropropulsion are more mundane, but no less essential, matters: How will the crew eat? How will they deal with boredom on the long mission? How will they get along with one another in a confined space?

Jul 20, 2020

The Same Company 3D Printing KFC’s Meat Nuggets Is Printing Human Tissue in Space As Well

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, food, space

Interesting.


No word on whether they’ve tried to print chicken nuggets in space, though.

Jul 20, 2020

Does green coffee bean extract work? A detailed review

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, health

Imagine if this very cheap thing could treat coronavirus 🤔

That would put a wrench in profiteers plans:

Green coffee bean extract is a popular weight loss and health supplement, but does it work, and is it safe?

Continue reading “Does green coffee bean extract work? A detailed review” »

Jul 19, 2020

The “1975 Diet” and the Secret of Japanese Longevity

Posted by in categories: food, life extension

Japan boasts one of the longest life expectancies on earth, and it also a world leader in “healthy life expectancy”—the number of years of good health people can expect on average. Since diet is believed to play a key role in a population’s health and longevity, researchers around the world have been studying the benefits of the Japanese diet for some time now.

But what exactly is the Japanese diet? The people of Japan do not dine primarily on sushi, tempura, or other well-known Japanese specialties. Moreover, their eating habits have changed over the years. For our research, we used national surveys to compile weekly menus representative of the Japanese diet at various points in time over the past half century. In the following, we will take a look at the comparative health effects of these menus.


The health benefits of Japanese cooking are widely touted, but what exactly is a healthy Japanese diet? Food scientists in Japan have homed in on the nutritional keys to health and longevity, and their conclusions may bode ill for the younger generation.

Continue reading “The ‘1975 Diet’ and the Secret of Japanese Longevity” »

Jul 17, 2020

Metal eating bacteria accidentally discovered by scientists

Posted by in categories: chemistry, food

California (CNN) (07/17/20) — Scientists have discovered a type of bacteria that eats and gets its calories from metal, after suspecting they exist for more than a hundred years but never proving it.

Now microbiologists from the California Institute of Technology (or Caltech) accidentally discovered the bacteria after performing unrelated experiments using a chalk-like type of manganese, a commonly found chemical element.

Dr. Jared Leadbetter, professor of environmental microbiology at Caltech in Pasadena, left a glass jar covered with the substance to soak in tap water in his office sink, and left the vessel for several months when he went to work off campus.

Continue reading “Metal eating bacteria accidentally discovered by scientists” »

Jul 17, 2020

Printer lickin‘ good: KFC is bioprinting chicken nuggets

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, bioprinting, food

“The partners are working together to develop the world’s first laboratory-produced chicken nuggets. The 3D printed nuggets are expected to be similar in taste and appearance to KFC’s original product, but will have the benefit of being more environmentally friendly to produce.”


When I think of KFC and its largely unchanging menu of fried chicken, I do not immediately think of innovation. However a new collaboration forged between the fast-food company and Russia-based bioprinting firm 3D Bioprinting Solutions might just change my mind. The partners are working together to develop the world’s first laboratory-produced chicken nuggets. The 3D printed nuggets are expected to be similar in taste and appearance to KFC’s original product, but will have the benefit of being more environmentally friendly to produce.

The bioprinted chicken nugget project is already underway, and the unlikely partners plan to have a final product ready for testing by this fall. The effort is part of KFC’s mission to create a “restaurant of the future” which leverages state-of-the-art technologies like 3D bioprinting to overcome solutions in the food industry today: such as finding more eco-friendly alternatives to traditional meat.

Continue reading “Printer lickin‘ good: KFC is bioprinting chicken nuggets” »

Jul 17, 2020

White Castle is testing a burger-grilling robot named Flippy

Posted by in categories: food, robotics/AI

White Castle is introducing a burger-grilling robot — and it might flip the entire restaurant industry.

Jul 16, 2020

Bacteria that eats metal accidentally discovered by scientists

Posted by in categories: chemistry, food

(CNN) — Scientists have discovered a type of bacteria that eats and gets its calories from metal, after suspecting they exist for more than a hundred years but never proving it.

Now microbiologists from the California Institute of Technology (or Caltech) accidentally discovered the bacteria after performing unrelated experiments using a chalk-like type of manganese, a commonly found chemical element.


(CNN)Scientists have discovered a type of bacteria that eats and gets its calories from metal, after suspecting they exist for more than a hundred years but never proving it.

Continue reading “Bacteria that eats metal accidentally discovered by scientists” »

Jul 16, 2020

Neuronal circuits in the brain ‘sense’ our inner state

Posted by in categories: food, neuroscience

Animals have an innate preference for certain scents and tastes. Attractive scents are linked to things like good food. Less attractive scents—that of spoiled food, for example—instinctively give the animal a signal which says: “There could be danger here!” When it comes to taste, all animals have similar preferences: Sugars and fats are perceived positively, whereas a bitter taste is perceived rather negatively.

In order to be able to make such evaluations, we need signals in the that tell us “This is good” or “This is bad.” The in the brain, better known as the reward system, plays an important role in these evaluations.

Jul 14, 2020

New way of studying genomics makes deep learning a breeze

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, robotics/AI

Researchers from the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine have developed a new tool that makes it easier to maximize the power of deep learning for studying genomics. They describe the new approach, Janggu, in the journal Nature Communications.

Imagine that before you could make dinner, you first had to rebuild the kitchen, specifically designed for each recipe. You’d spend way more time on preparation, than actually cooking. For computational biologists, it’s been a similar time-consuming process for analyzing . Before they can even begin their analysis, they spend a lot of valuable time formatting and preparing huge data sets to feed into deep learning models.

To streamline this process, researchers from MDC developed a universal programming tool that converts a wide variety of genomics data into the required format for analysis by deep learning models. “Before, you ended up wasting a lot of time on the technical aspect, rather than focusing on the biological question you were trying to answer,” says Dr. Wolfgang Kopp, a scientist in the Bioinformatics and Omics Data Science research group at MDC’s Berlin Institute of Medical Systems Biology (BIMSB), and first author of the paper. “With Janggu, we are aiming to relieve some of that technical burden and make it accessible to as many people as possible.”

Page 1 of 14812345678Last