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Archive for the ‘information science’ category

Mar 15, 2019

This AI outperformed 20 corporate lawyers at legal work

Posted by in categories: information science, law, robotics/AI

It was 100 times faster on a routine task.


In a recent study, LawGeex, a legal tech startup, challenged a group of 20 experienced lawyers to test their skills and knowledge against its AI-powered algorithm.

A legal battle

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Mar 14, 2019

How to Steal DNA With Sound

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, information science, mobile phones

The latest Facebook hack should have shown everyone nothing is safe. Researchers have now shown how easy it is to steal data from people doing research.

Engineers at the University of California say they have demonstrated how easy it would be to snoop on biotech companies making synthetic DNAll you need is an audio recording, they say. Place a smartphone near a DNA synthesizer, record the sound, run the recording across algorithms trained to discern the clicks and buzzes that particular machine makes, and you’ll know exactly what combination of DNA building blocks it is generating.


Researchers devise method for snooping on DNA synthesis using acoustic recordings. But is it a real threat?

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Mar 13, 2019

IBM made a quantum algorithm that could make AI more powerful

Posted by in categories: information science, quantum physics, robotics/AI

Artificial intelligence can automatically sort out data, but it struggles for some particularly complex datasets – a quantum algorithm could do better.

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Mar 11, 2019

A robotic leg, born without prior knowledge, learns to walk

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, engineering, information science, robotics/AI

For a newborn giraffe or wildebeest, being born can be a perilous introduction to the world—predators lie in wait for an opportunity to make a meal of the herd’s weakest member. This is why many species have evolved ways for their juveniles to find their footing within minutes of birth.

It’s an astonishing evolutionary feat that has long inspired biologists and roboticists—and now a team of USC researchers at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering believe they have become the first to create an AI-controlled robotic limb driven by animal-like tendons that can even be tripped up and then recover within the time of the next footfall, a task for which the was never explicitly programmed to do.

Francisco J. Valero-Cuevas, a professor of Biomedical Engineering a professor of Biokinesiology & Physical Therapy at USC in a project with USC Viterbi School of Engineering doctoral student Ali Marjaninejad and two other doctoral students—Dario Urbina-Melendez and Brian Cohn, have developed a bio-inspired algorithm that can learn a new walking task by itself after only 5 minutes of unstructured play, and then adapt to other tasks without any additional programming.

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Mar 9, 2019

Waking Up with Sam Harris

Posted by in categories: economics, governance, information science, robotics/AI

James Hughes : “Great convo with Yuval Harari, touching on algorithmic governance, the perils of being a big thinker when democracy is under attack, the need for transnational governance, the threats of automation to the developing world, the practical details of UBI, and a lot more.”


In this episode of the Waking Up podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Yuval Noah Harari about his new book 21 Lessons for the 21st Century. They discuss the importance of meditation for his intellectual life, the primacy of stories, the need to revise our fundamental assumptions about human civilization, the threats to liberal democracy, a world without work, universal basic income, the virtues of nationalism, the implications of AI and automation, and other topics.

Yuval Noah Harari has a PhD in History from the University of Oxford and lectures at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, specializing in world history. His books have been translated into 50+ languages, with 12+ million copies sold worldwide. Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind looked deep into our past, Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow considered far-future scenarios, and 21 Lessons for the 21st Century focuses on the biggest questions of the present moment.

Twitter: @harari_yuval

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Mar 9, 2019

The World’s Most Valuable AI Companies, and What They’re Working On

Posted by in categories: business, finance, information science, robotics/AI

Artificial intelligence and its subset of disciplines—such as machine learning, natural language processing, and computer vision —are seemingly becoming integrated into our daily lives whether we like it or not. What was once sci-fi is now ubiquitous research and development in company and university labs around the world.

Similarly, the startups working on many of these AI technologies have seen their proverbial stock rise. More than 30 of these companies are now valued at over a billion dollars, according to data research firm CB Insights, which itself employs algorithms to provide insights into the tech business world.

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Mar 7, 2019

Google’s Doodle celebrates Russian mathematician Olga Ladyzhenskaya’s 97th birth anniversary

Posted by in category: information science

Google’s Doodle on Thursday marked the 97th birth anniversary of Russian mathematician Olga Ladyzhenskaya. She was known for her work on partial differential equations and in the field of fluid dynamics, which led to several developments in the study of fluid dynamics and paved the way for advances in weather forecasting, oceanography, aerodynamics, and cardiovascular science.

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Mar 6, 2019

The Algorithm Will See You Now: How AI is Helping Doctors Diagnose and Treat Patients

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, information science, robotics/AI

Artificial intelligence researchers are building tools to quickly and accurately turn data into diagnoses. But practical limitations and ethical concerns mean humans should remain in charge.

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Mar 6, 2019

The Math That Takes Newton Into the Quantum World

Posted by in categories: information science, mathematics, quantum physics, transportation

In my 50s, too old to become a real expert, I have finally fallen in love with algebraic geometry. As the name suggests, this is the study of geometry using algebra. Around 1637, René Descartes laid the groundwork for this subject by taking a plane, mentally drawing a grid on it, as we now do with graph paper, and calling the coordinates x and y. We can write down an equation like x + y = 1, and there will be a curve consisting of points whose coordinates obey this equation. In this example, we get a circle!

It was a revolutionary idea at the time, because it let us systematically convert questions about geometry into questions about equations, which we can solve if we’re good enough at algebra. Some mathematicians spend their whole lives on this majestic subject. But I never really liked it much until recently—now that I’ve connected it to my interest in quantum physics.

If we can figure out how to reduce topology to algebra, it might help us formulate a theory of quantum gravity.

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Mar 6, 2019

The A.I. Diet

Posted by in categories: food, government, information science, robotics/AI

Opinion

Forget government-issued food pyramids. Let an algorithm tell you how to eat.

Credit Credit Erik Blad

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