БЛОГ

Archive for the ‘neuroscience’ category

Jul 20, 2021

Scientists Warn of “Bleak Cyborg Future” From Brain-Computer Interfaces

Posted by in categories: biological, computing, cyborgs, law, neuroscience

Researchers warn of the potential social, ethical, and legal consequences of technologies interacting heavily with human brains.

Surpassing the biological limitations of the brain and using one’s mind to interact with and control external electronic devices may sound like the distant cyborg future, but it could come sooner than we think.

Researchers from Imperial College London conducted a review of modern commercial brain-computer interface (BCI) devices, and they discuss the primary technological limitations and humanitarian concerns of these devices in APL Bioengineering, from AIP Publishing.

Continue reading “Scientists Warn of ‘Bleak Cyborg Future’ From Brain-Computer Interfaces” »

Jul 20, 2021

Dr. Jean M. Hebert, Ph.D. — Replacing Aging — Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, life extension, neuroscience

Replacing Aging — Dr. Jean M. Hebert, Ph.D. Albert Einstein College of Medicine.


Dr. Jean M. Hebert, Ph.D. (https://einsteinmed.org/faculty/9069/jean-hebert/) is Professor in the Department of Genetics and in the Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience, at Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Continue reading “Dr. Jean M. Hebert, Ph.D. — Replacing Aging — Albert Einstein College of Medicine” »

Jul 20, 2021

Solid State Batteries — Autumn 2021 mass production in Japan. Is it FINALLY happening?

Posted by in categories: neuroscience, sustainability

Solid state batteries are the long-promised Holy Grail of battery technology. They’re smaller and better than existing Lithium Ion batteries. They charge more quickly and last much longer. What’s not to like? Trouble is, no-one’s managed to mass produce one at any useful scale yet. Turns out it’s quite tricky to make them reliable! Now though, two major Japanese companies are finally firing up their full production lines. So will 2021 be the year?

Video Transcripts available at our website.
http://www.justhaveathink.com.

Continue reading “Solid State Batteries — Autumn 2021 mass production in Japan. Is it FINALLY happening?” »

Jul 20, 2021

Chemists Found an Effective Remedy for “Aged” Brain Diseases

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, neuroscience

Summary: Newly synthesized compounds can halt the degradation of neurons in a range of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, researchers say.

Source: Ural Federal University

Russian scientists have synthesized chemical compounds that can stop the degeneration of neurons in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and other severe brain pathologies. These substances can provide a breakthrough in the treatment of neurodegenerative pathologies.

Continue reading “Chemists Found an Effective Remedy for ‘Aged’ Brain Diseases” »

Jul 20, 2021

Non-Neuronal Cells Drive Sex Differences in Early Brain Development

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience, sex

“In this study, for the first time, we see evidence that events which were always assumed to be occurring in the same manner, regardless of sex, may actually be completely different in males compared to females. The fact that these differences involve astrocytes, which have traditionally been ignored in neuroscience but have recently become a hot topic for study, makes them all the more intriguing.”


Summary: Thrombospondin-2, a protein with cell adhesion properties usually secreted by astrocytes, prompted a strong increase in synapses in male-derived neurons but showed no effect in females.

Source: Marshall University

Continue reading “Non-Neuronal Cells Drive Sex Differences in Early Brain Development” »

Jul 20, 2021

Autism Can Be Detected During Toddlerhood Using a Brief Questionnaire

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Summary: A newly developed questionnaire can detect autism in children between the ages of 18 to 30 months.

Source: University of Cambridge.

New research led by the University of Cambridge suggests that autism can be detected at 18–30 months using the Quantitative Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (Q-CHAT), but it is not possible to identify every child at a young age who will later be diagnosed as autistic.

Jul 20, 2021

Can Consciousness Be Explained by Quantum Physics?

Posted by in categories: computing, cosmology, neuroscience, particle physics, quantum physics

One of the most important open questions in science is how our consciousness is established. In the 1990s, long before winning the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics for his prediction of black holes, physicist Roger Penrose teamed up with anaesthesiologist Stuart Hameroff to propose an ambitious answer.

They claimed that the brain’s neuronal system forms an intricate network and that the consciousness this produces should obey the rules of quantum mechanics – the theory that determines how tiny particles like electrons move around. This, they argue, could explain the mysterious complexity of human consciousness.

Continue reading “Can Consciousness Be Explained by Quantum Physics?” »

Jul 18, 2021

SUV39H2: A direct genetic link to autism spectrum disorders

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, neuroscience

New research from the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) in Japan shows that a deficit in histone methylation could lead to the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A human variant of the SUV39H2 gene led researchers to examine its absence in mice. Published in Molecular Psychiatry, the study found that when absent, adult mice exhibited cognitive inflexibility similar to what occurs in autism, and embryonic mice showed misregulated expression of genes related to brain development. These findings represent the first direct link between the SUV39H2 gene and ASD.

Genes are turned on and off throughout our development. But genetic variation means that what is turned off in some people remains turned on in others. This is why, for example, some adults can digest dairy products and others are lactose intolerant; the gene for making the enzyme lactase is turned off when some people become adults, but not others. One way that genes can be turned on and off is through a process called histone methylation in which special enzymes transfer methyl groups to histone proteins that are wrapped around DNA.

Variations in genes related to methylation during brain development can lead to serious problems. One such variation occurs in a rare disorder called Kleefstra Syndrome, in which a mutation prevents methylation of H3K9—a specific location on histone H3. Because Kleefstra Syndrome resembles autism in some ways, RIKEN CBS researchers led by Takeo Yoshikawa looked for autism-specific variations in genes that can modify H3K9. Among nine such genes, they found one variant in an H3K9 methyltransferase gene— SUV39H2 —that was present in autism, and the mutated SUV39H2 prevented methylation when tested in the lab. Similar loss-of-function results were found for the mouse version of the variant.

Jul 18, 2021

Psilocybin induces rapid and persistent growth of neural connections in the brain’s frontal cortex, study finds

Posted by in category: neuroscience

Harvard scientists have found that a single dose of psilocybin given to mice induces a rapid and long-lasting increase in connections between pyramidal neurons in the medial frontal cortex, an area of the brain known to be involved in control and decision-making. Their new findings are published in the journal Neuron.

Psilocybin — the active component in so-called “magic” mushrooms — has been shown to have profound and long-lasting effects on personality and mood. Preliminary studies have provided hope that psilocybin could help to relieve depression symptoms and treat other mental disorders. But the mechanisms behind these effects remain unclear.

A team of researchers at Yale University were interested in examining whether the lasting therapeutic effects of psilocybin might be caused in part by the substance’s ability to enhance neuroplasticity in the brain.

Continue reading “Psilocybin induces rapid and persistent growth of neural connections in the brain’s frontal cortex, study finds” »

Jul 18, 2021

Where You Live Can Greatly Affect Your Heart and Brain Health

Posted by in categories: health, neuroscience, policy

Something to consider.

“The whole idea of lifestyle choices as something everyone can tap into is misleading, when in fact that choice is constrained by what is available to people,” he said. “This is where policy solutions or investments into these neighborhoods to make up for historical disinvestment becomes so important.”


Summary: The neighborhood you live in could have an impact on your brain and cardiovascular health, a new study reports.

Continue reading “Where You Live Can Greatly Affect Your Heart and Brain Health” »

Page 1 of 47012345678Last