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Archive for the ‘chemistry’ category: Page 261

Aug 2, 2016

The Next Five Years will be a Critical Time for the Development of Rejuvenation Biotechnology after the SENS Model of Damage Repair

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, chemistry, internet, life extension

Tempus fugit. I’m just about old enough to remember a time in which 2020 was the distant future of science fiction novels, too far away to be thinking about in concrete terms, a foreign and fantastical land in which anything might happen. Several anythings did in fact happen, such as the internet, and the ongoing revolution in biotechnology that has transformed the laboratory world but leaks into clinics only all too slowly. Here we are, however, close enough to be making plans and figuring out what we expect to be doing when the third decade of the 21st century gets underway. The fantastical becomes the mundane. We don’t yet have regeneration of organs and limbs, or therapies to greatly extend life, but for these and many other staples of golden age science fiction, the scientific community has come close enough to be able to talk in detail about the roads to achieving these goals.

Of all the things that researchers might achieve with biotechnology in the near future, control over aging is by far the most important. Aging is the greatest cause of death and suffering in the world, and none of us are getting any younger. That may change, however. SENS, the Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence, is a synthesis of the scientific view of aging as an accumulation of specific forms of cell and tissue damage, pulling in a century of evidence from many diverse areas of medical science to support this conclusion. Aging happens because the normal operation of our cellular biochemistry produces damage, wear and tear at the level of molecules and molecular structures, and some of that damage accumulates to cause failure of tissues and organs, and ultimately death.

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Jul 31, 2016

Lab 2.0: Will Computers Replace Experimental Science?

Posted by in categories: chemistry, computing, mobile phones, physics, science, solar power, sustainability

We spend our lives surrounded by hi-tech materials and chemicals that make our batteries, solar cells and mobile phones work. But developing new technologies requires time-consuming, expensive and even dangerous experiments.

Luckily we now have a secret weapon that allows us to save time, money and risk by avoiding some of these experiments: computers.

Continue reading “Lab 2.0: Will Computers Replace Experimental Science?” »

Jul 29, 2016

He Wants to Inject Your Bloodstream With Healing Nanobots

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, nanotechnology

This Catalonian chemistry wiz is developing a jet-pack engine to deliver medicine inside our bodies.

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Jul 26, 2016

Welcome to Lab 2.0 Where Computers Replace Experimental Science

Posted by in categories: chemistry, computing, mobile phones, physics, science, solar power, sustainability

We spend our lives surrounded by high-tech materials and chemicals that make our batteries, solar cells and mobile phones work. But developing new technologies requires time-consuming, expensive and even dangerous experiments.

Luckily we now have a secret weapon that allows us to save time, money and risk by avoiding some of these experiments: computers.

Continue reading “Welcome to Lab 2.0 Where Computers Replace Experimental Science” »

Jul 26, 2016

Quantum dot photosensitizers as a new paradigm for photochemical activation

Posted by in categories: chemistry, quantum physics, solar power, sustainability

Interesting work on solar energy and Q-dot photosensitizers.


Interfacial triplet-triplet energy transfer is used to significantly extend the exciton lifetime of cadmium selenide nanocrystals in an experimental demonstration of their molecular-like photochemistry.

Continue reading “Quantum dot photosensitizers as a new paradigm for photochemical activation” »

Jul 19, 2016

Quantum computers show potential to revolutionize chemistry

Posted by in categories: chemistry, neuroscience, quantum physics, robotics/AI, solar power, supercomputing, sustainability

Like this feature on QC.


If you have trouble wrapping your mind around quantum physics, don’t worry — it’s even hard for supercomputers. The solution, according to researchers from Google, Harvard, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories and others? Why, use a quantum computer, of course. The team accurately predicted chemical reaction rates using a supercooled quantum circuit, a result that could lead to improved solar cells, batteries, flexible electronics and much more.

Chemical reactions are inherently quantum themselves — the team actually used a quote from Richard Feynman saying “nature isn’t classical, dammit.” The problem is that “molecular systems form highly entangled quantum superposition states, which require many classical computing resources in order to represent sufficiently high precision,” according to the Google Research blog. Computing the lowest energy state for propane, a relatively simple molecule, takes around ten days, for instance. That figure is required in order to get the reaction rate.

Continue reading “Quantum computers show potential to revolutionize chemistry” »

Jul 18, 2016

Profusa to Showcase Tissue-integrated Sensors for Long-term Continuous Monitoring of Body Chemistry at the Pioneers Festival in Vienna

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, chemistry, health, mobile phones

Lumee™ tissue-O2 monitoring system slated to be available this year in Europe

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., May 16, 2016 — Profusa, Inc. announced today that it was selected by Pioneers, the global business relationship builder, to showcase the company’s “wear-and-forget” Lumee™ biosensor technology at the Pioneers Festival held at the prestigious Hofburg Imperial Palace in Vienna, Austria, May 24th-25th.

Making health and disease monitoring as easy as turning on your smart phone, the company’s tissue-integrated sensors for long-term, continuous tracking of body chemistry will be highlighted by Ben Hwang, Profusa’s chairman and chief executive officer, in a talk entitled, “Beyond Fitness Trackers: Let Your Body Speak.”

Continue reading “Profusa to Showcase Tissue-integrated Sensors for Long-term Continuous Monitoring of Body Chemistry at the Pioneers Festival in Vienna” »

Jul 18, 2016

‘Smart’ thread collects diagnostic data when sutured into tissue

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, computing, health, mobile phones, nanotechnology, wearables

Way cool! Your stitches monitors and reports your progress to your doctor/s.

BTW — In 1999, I told a guy from Diamond Intl. that the thread in our clothing would be able to do this in the next 15 to 20 years. He laughed at me; never say never.


For the first time, researchers led by Tufts University engineers have integrated nano-scale sensors, electronics and microfluidics into threads — ranging from simple cotton to sophisticated synthetics — that can be sutured through multiple layers of tissue to gather diagnostic data wirelessly in real time, according to a paper published online July 18 in Microsystems & Nanoengineering. The research suggests that the thread-based diagnostic platform could be an effective substrate for a new generation of implantable diagnostic devices and smart wearable systems.

Continue reading “‘Smart’ thread collects diagnostic data when sutured into tissue” »

Jul 16, 2016

DARPA Invests $7.5 Million for Implantable Biosensor that are 3 millimeters long and 500 microns in diameter

Posted by in categories: chemistry, health, internet, military

Profusa (South San Francisco, CA) has won a $7.5 million grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the U.S. Army Research Office for further development of its tissue integrated biosensor technology, the company said Tuesday.

The U.S. military sees value in the technology improving mission efficiency through real-time monitoring of combat soldier health status.

Continue reading “DARPA Invests $7.5 Million for Implantable Biosensor that are 3 millimeters long and 500 microns in diameter” »

Jul 16, 2016

Silicon Valley Entrepreneurs Aim To ‘Hack’ the Brain

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, chemistry, cybercrime/malcode, neuroscience

Woo and other entrepreneurs are using fasts and other tricks to “hack” their brain chemistry like they would a computer, hoping to give themselves an edge as they strive to dream up the next billion-dollar idea. Known by insiders as “biohacking,” the push for cognitive self-improvement is gaining momentum in the Silicon Valley tech world, where workers face constant pressure to innovate and produce at the highest levels.

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