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Archive for the ‘computing’ category: Page 529

Nov 11, 2017

Scientists decipher mechanisms in cells for extending human longevity

Posted by in categories: biological, computing, engineering, life extension

Aging cells periodically switch their chromatin state. The image illustrates the “on” and “off” patterns in individual cells. (credit: UC San Diego)

A team of scientists at the University of California San Diego led by biologist Nan Hao have combined engineering, computer science, and biology technologies to decode the molecular processes in cells that influence aging.

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Nov 10, 2017

IBM says it’s reached milestone in quantum computing

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

IBM has announced a milestone in its race against Google and other big tech firms to build a powerful quantum computer.

Dario Gil, who leads IBM’s and artificial intelligence research division, said Friday that the company’s scientists have successfully built and measured a processor prototype with 50 , known as qubits.

Gil says it’s the first time any company has built a quantum computer at this scale.

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Nov 10, 2017

IBM announces a trailblazing quantum machine

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Researchers have built the most sophisticated quantum computer yet, signaling progress toward a powerful new way of processing information.

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Nov 7, 2017

Fluidic transistor ushers the age of liquid computers

Posted by in categories: computing, neuroscience, space travel

Transistors, those tiny electrical switches that process signals and data, are the brain power behind every electronic device – from laptops and smartphones to your digital thermostat. As they continue to shrink in size, computers have become smaller, more powerful, and more pervasive. However, as we look to build squishy, human-friendly machines that have the look and feel of soft natural organisms, we need to look beyond the rigid materials used to create electrical switches and circuits.

Mechanical engineers Carmel Majidi and James Wissman of the Soft Machines Lab at Carnegie Mellon University have been looking at new ways to create electronics that are not just digitally functional but also soft and deformable. Rather than making from rigid metals like copper or silver, they use a special metal alloy that is liquid at room temperature. This alloy, made by mixing indium and gallium, is a non-toxic alternative to mercury and can be infused in rubber to make circuits that are as soft and elastic as natural skin.

Teaming up with Michael Dickey at North Carolina State University, they recently discovered that electronics are not only useful for stretchable circuit wiring but can also be used to make . These fluidic transistors work by opening and closing the connection between two liquid metal droplets. When a voltage drop is applied in one direction, the droplets move towards each other and coalesce to form a metallic bridge for conducting electricity. When voltage is applied in a different direction, the droplets spontaneously break apart and turn the switch to open. By quickly alternating between an open and closed and open switch state with only a small amount of voltage, the researchers were able to mimic the properties of a conventional transistor.

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Nov 3, 2017

This Captivating Sci-Fi Short Film Was Randomly Generated By a Computer

Posted by in categories: alien life, computing, mathematics

We wouldn’t blame you for thinking that Julius Horsthuis spent weeks designing and animating his sci-fi short, Fraktaal, using 3D software. But as the artist reveals, “It so happens that I’m a lazy animator.” So he instead relied on complex mathematical fractal patterns to automatically generate the alien worlds and cities visited in his film.

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Nov 3, 2017

Scientists decipher mechanisms underlying the biology of aging

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, computing, life extension

Understanding the factors that control aging has been one of humanity’s endless pursuits, from the mystical fountain of youth to practical healthful regimens to prolong life expectancy.

A team of scientists at the University of California San Diego has helped decipher the dynamics that control how our cells age, and with it implications for extending human longevity. As described in a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a group led by biologist Nan Hao employed a combination of technologies in engineering, computer science and biology to analyze molecular processes that influence aging.

As cells age, damage in their DNA accumulates over time, leading to decay in normal functioning and eventually resulting in death. A natural biochemical process known as “chromatin silencing” helps protect DNA from damage. The silencing process converts specific regions of DNA from a loose, open state into a closed one, thus shielding DNA regions. Among the molecules that promote silencing is a family of proteins—broadly conserved from bacteria to humans—known as sirtuins. In recent years, chemical activators of sirtuins have received much attention and are being marketed as nutraceuticals to aid chromatin silencing in the hopes of slowing the aging process.

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Nov 2, 2017

Transhumanism: A technological “worldview”

Posted by in categories: computing, mobile phones, transhumanism

A local ABC story on #transhumanism:


NORFOLK, Va. (WVEC) — From the minute we wake up until we go to sleep, we’re constantly surrounded by technology.

Computers, cell phones, iPads, they’ve become ingrained in our everyday lives.

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Oct 29, 2017

Scientists Have Trained a Quantum Machine to Find The Higgs Boson

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Could a quantum computer find the Higgs boson faster than humans?

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Oct 28, 2017

Google Debuts Software to Open Up Quantum Computers for Chemists

Posted by in categories: computing, information science, quantum physics

Google unveiled software aimed at making it easier for scientists to use the quantum computers in a move designed to give a boost to the nascent industry.

The software, which is open-source and free to use, could be used by chemists and material scientists to adapt algorithms and equations to run on quantum computers. It comes at a time when Google, IBM, Intel Corp., Microsoft Corp. and D-Wave Systems Inc. are all pushing to create quantum computers that can be used for commercial applications.

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Oct 25, 2017

A sneak peak at radical future user interfaces for phones, computers, and VR

Posted by in categories: computing, mobile phones, virtual reality, wearables

Neat!


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