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Archive for the ‘computing’ category: Page 557

Jan 29, 2017

MIT’s Food Computers Set the Stage for Open Source Agriculture

Posted by in categories: climatology, computing, food, sustainability

Most of us probably don’t think too much about the foodstuffs we buy in the supermarket. But behind the scenes, today’s food production system relies on a centralized, industrial-scale supply chain that’s still dependent upon soil-based agriculture for the majority of our food crops.

In many instances, that means that food has to travel long distances from farm to table, meaning that food has lost much of its freshness and nutritional value by the time it reaches your table. There’s also a growing awareness that this model isn’t sustainable: the pressures of increasing urbanization and loss of arable land, rising populations and the increased frequency of extreme weather events like droughts and floods — brought on by climate change — means that slowly but surely, we are going to have to change the way we grow our food.

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Jan 29, 2017

CAE Healthcare Unveils First Mixed Reality Ultrasound Simulation Solution

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, biotech/medical, computing, holograms

My doctor needs one of these.


CAE Healthcare announced the release of CAE VimedixAR, an ultrasound training simulator integrated with the Microsoft HoloLens, the world’s first self-contained holographic computer. The announcment marks CAE Healthcare as the first company to bring a commercial Microsoft HoloLens application to the medical simulation market.

VimedixAR delivers an unprecedented simulation-based training experience, allowing learners to interact and move freely within a clinical training environment that is augmented with holograms. For the first time, students will be able to examine 3D anatomy inside the body of the Vimedix manikin. As learners practice scanning an animated heart, lungs or abdomen, they will observe in real-time how the ultrasound beam cuts through anatomy to generate a ultrasound image.

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Jan 29, 2017

Vanishing point: the rise of the invisible computer

Posted by in categories: computing, nanotechnology, quantum physics

Yep; devices and computers will no longer be needed given the advancements that are coming in areas of Quantum, Synbio, nanotech, etc.

However, with QC crystal technology and the work done on parallel states we have some very interesting things coming in communications, entertainment/ media, etc.


The long read: For decades, computers have got smaller and more powerful, enabling huge scientific progress. But this can’t go on for ever. What happens when they stop shrinking?

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Jan 29, 2017

Scientists have confirmed a brand new form of matter: time crystals

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics, time travel

More information on the time crystals to simulate time travel.


Two more teams of researchers have found ways to create time crystals, lattices that repeat not in space but in time, breaking time-translation symmetry.

Though applications are unclear, the research could help us better understand quantum properties and solve the problem of quantum memory associated with quantum computing. Time crystals repeat their atomic structure in time. At the very least, they are a contradiction.

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Jan 27, 2017

Earth makes its own water deep in the mantle, study finds

Posted by in categories: computing, space

Scientists have long been perplexed by the mystery of how Earth got its water, with many suggesting it formed after icy comets collided with our planet billions of years ago.

But, a new study suggest it may have been born within Earth itself.

New computer simulations show how reactions between liquid hydrogen and quartz in the upper mantle could form water – and the researchers say this could trigger earthquakes deep below the surface.

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Jan 27, 2017

U.S. scientists could have squeezed hydrogen all the way into a potentially superconducting metal

Posted by in categories: computing, physics, transportation

For over 80 years, scientists all round the world have dreamt of converting hydrogen, the first element of the periodic table, into a metal. And now, after hundreds of failed attempts in the history, scientists from U.S. have finally managed the feat by compressing hydrogen so profoundly that it has turned into a metal!

Back in 1935, physicists Hillard Bell Huntington and Eugene Wigner proposed a theory that hydrogen, which normally exists in a gaseous state, could transform into metallic state once exposed to extreme pressure. Since then many scientists have tried to practically prove the theory — albeit unsuccessfully. However, this discovery, which was published in the journal ‘Science’ on Thursday, is the first confirmation of the theory.

The metallic hydrogen is a potential superconductor, a material with extraordinary electricity conducting capabilities, a quality which makes it a very expensive metal. But it holds the ability of revolutionizing the world of ultra fast super computers, high speed levitation trains, or any other thing which involves conduction of electricity.

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Jan 27, 2017

DARPA teams with Flex Logix to develop FPGA technology for government agencies designing ICs

Posted by in categories: computing, government

DARPA licenses embedded FPGA tech for U.S. government projects.

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, also known as DARPA, just signed an agreement to work with Flex Logix, a semiconductor start-up, to develop the young company’s EFLX embedded FPGA technology for use by any company or government agency designing integrated circuits for the U.S. government.

FPGAs have been widely used in systems since the 1980s and, at the system level, provide flexibility and programmability different from what processors can do. Many years ago, ARM took the idea of a processor chip and offered a processor architecture, which could be embedded in chips. Although it took time, embedded processors are now nearly ubiquitous. Flex Logix is doing the same for embedded FPGAs.

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Jan 27, 2017

Quantum Breakthrough: Physicists Have Once More Created Time Crystals

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

In Brief

  • Two more teams of researchers have found ways to create time crystals, lattices that repeat not in space but in time, breaking time-translation symmetry.
  • Though applications are unclear, the research could help us better understand quantum properties and solve the problem of quantum memory associated with quantum computing.

Time crystals are strange. At the very least, they are a contradiction. A time crystal is quantum phenomenon that demonstrates movement while remaining in its ground, or lowest energy, state. Essentially a non-equilibrium form of matter, time crystals are lattices that repeat not in space but in time, breaking time-translation symmetry.

When the idea of a time crystal was proposed in 2012 by physicist and Nobel laureate Frank Wilczek, it was only a theoretical possibility that would challenge many of the laws of physics. Then, in October 2016, a team of researchers from the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) managed to make a “floquet time crystal.”

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Jan 26, 2017

Hydrogen turned into metal in stunning act of alchemy that could revolutionise technology and spaceflight

Posted by in categories: computing, space travel

For nearly 100 years, scientists have dreamed of turning the lightest of all the elements, hydrogen, into a metal.

Now, in a stunning act of modern-day alchemy, scientists at Harvard University have finally succeeded in creating a tiny amount of what is the rarest, and possibly most valuable, material on the planet, they reported in the journal Science.

For metallic hydrogen could theoretically revolutionise technology, enabling the creation of super-fast computers, high-speed levitating trains and ultra-efficient vehicles and dramatically improving almost anything involving electricity.

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Jan 24, 2017

D-Wave’s $15 million quantum computer runs a staggering 2,000 qubits

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

For D-Wave, the path to quantum computers being widely accepted is similar to the history of today’s computers. The first chips came more than 30 years ago, and Microsoft’s Basic expanded the software infrastructure around PCs.

Quantum computers are a new type of computer that can be significantly faster than today’s PCs. They are still decades away from replacing PCs and going mainstream, but more advanced hardware and use models are still emerging.

“A lot of that is unfolding and will have a similar dramatic change in the computing landscape,” Vern Brownell, D-Wave’s CEO, said in an interview.

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