БЛОГ

Archive for the ‘encryption’ category: Page 17

Jan 11, 2017

Cybercriminals charge just £20 to paralyse websites

Posted by in categories: encryption, security

Want to take someone’s site down and need a cheap hacker; well the Dark Web has them.


In the lawless digital hinterlands of the dark web, hackers hire out their expertise for just £20, offering to cripple websites with an overload of data from ready-made “botnet” armies.

On hidden forums, accessible only by using encrypted technology, clients tout for their services, bidding to have cybercriminals perform all manner of illegal activities, such as compromising university systems to alter grades.

Continue reading “Cybercriminals charge just £20 to paralyse websites” »

Jan 5, 2017

The Future Of Encryption

Posted by in categories: business, cybercrime/malcode, encryption, engineering, internet, quantum physics

QC in the mainstream is definitely viable less than 7 yrs. and possible within 5 yrs. However, I have a friend who even believes we’re looking at 3 years.


Internet security, once considered to be strictly in the domain of the wonkiest tech experts, has become central to public discourse over the past year. Besides the attacks on the DNC, even tech savvy business like Snapchat, Oracle and Verizon Enterprise Solutions have had significant breaches in the last year.

For the most part, these attacks were preventable. Often, hackers use a technique called social engineering, to trick people into allowing them into a system. Other times, they exploit a vulnerability in software to give them access to confidential data. In most cases, more stringent procedures can prevent attacks.

Continue reading “The Future Of Encryption” »

Jan 5, 2017

Cryptographers Rally to NIST Call for Quantum Computer Algorithms

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, encryption, government, information science, military, privacy, quantum physics

Has anyone besides NSA, NIST, DARPA, IARPA, etc. realize and thought about what type of cyber warfare will exist in a QC world? The skillsets alone will be so far advance than the techies that we have seen in most companies today as well as in most government agencies. Granted we’re simplifying things with the platform; however, skillsets will still need to be more advance than what we have seen with the standard techie.


Members of the cryptography community have expressed interest in the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s (NIST) recent call for an algorithm less susceptible to hacks from a computer that does not exist yet.

NIST announced a call for proposals for post-quantum cryptography standardization on Dec. 20. One or more of the proposed algorithms will ultimately replace some of NIST’s cryptographic standards that are most vulnerable to quantum computers. According to Dustin Moody, a mathematician at NIST, 40 people have joined the agency’s online cryptography forum since the call was announced two weeks ago. The forum had about 200 members before the call went out. Moody said that many people were anticipating the announcement, as cryptography enthusiasts tend to run in the same circles.

Continue reading “Cryptographers Rally to NIST Call for Quantum Computer Algorithms” »

Jan 2, 2017

US Government Escalates Push for Post-Quantum Cryptography

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, cybercrime/malcode, encryption, government, information science, privacy, quantum physics

Federal agencies of the US government are expanding their calls for quantum computing resistant encryption methods. In effect, the National Institute of Standards (NIST) recently announced a request for public-key post-quantum algorithms. This action follows warnings from the National Security Agency (NSA) about the risks of potential quantum-based cyberattacks and the NSA’s appeal for developing post-quantum algorithms.

Also read: New Developments in Quantum Computing Impact Bitcoin

Moreover, in the near future, it might possible for anyone to manipulate the awesome power of quantum computing. The astronomical price of a quantum computer would not be a limitation because, for example, IBM is offering to the general public quantum computing via the cloud.

Continue reading “US Government Escalates Push for Post-Quantum Cryptography” »

Dec 30, 2016

Quantum Computing and why we need to replace the Internet

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, internet, quantum physics

More believers; loving it!


Video by: Jan-Henrik Kulberg

Continue reading “Quantum Computing and why we need to replace the Internet” »

Dec 26, 2016

Ultra-Small Nanocavity Advances Technology for Quantum-Based Data Encryption

Posted by in categories: encryption, nanotechnology, quantum physics

What’s next? Nanocavities in a diamond for small devices.


Researchers have developed a new type of light-enhancing optical cavity that is only 200 nanometers tall and 100 nanometers across. Their new nanoscale system represents a step toward brighter single-photon sources, which could help propel quantum-based encryption techniques under development.

Quantum encryption techniques, which are seen as likely to be central to future data encryption methods, use individual photons as an extremely secure way to encode data. A limitation of these techniques has been the ability to emit photons at high rates. “One of the most important figures of merit for single-photon sources is brightness — or collected photons per second — because the brighter it is, the more data you can transmit securely with quantum encryption,” said Yousif Kelaita of Stanford University.

Continue reading “Ultra-Small Nanocavity Advances Technology for Quantum-Based Data Encryption” »

Dec 25, 2016

Russia offers technology to keep hackers at bay

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, encryption, finance, government, neuroscience, quantum physics

Russian Quantum Center (RQC) said that it is ready to collaborate with India and offer its quantum technology that will prevent hackers from breaking into bank accounts. RQC plans to offer ‘quantum cryptography’ that could propel India to the forefront of hack proof communication in sectors such as banking and national and homeland security.

“We are ready to work with Indian colleagues. It (the technology) can’t be bought from the United States as it deals with the government and security,” said Ruslan Yunusov, chief executive at RQC, in an interview.

Established by Russia’s largest global technology hub, Skolkovo in 2010, RQC conducts scientific research that could lead to a new class of technologies. These include developing ‘unbreakable cryptography’ for the banks and the government organisations. It also involves research in areas such as materials with superior properties and new systems for ultrasensitive imaging of the brain. The research is mostly funded by the government money.

Continue reading “Russia offers technology to keep hackers at bay” »

Dec 22, 2016

News in brief: Groupon grief; Apple encryption delay; post-quantum crypto

Posted by in categories: encryption, mobile phones, quantum physics, security

Your daily round-up of some of the other security stories in the news

Groupon grief – was it password reuse?

The Telegraph reports that crooks have hijacked a number of Groupon accounts and used them to purchase expensive items like games consoles, iPhones and holidays. Some victims have suffered thousands of pounds of losses.

Continue reading “News in brief: Groupon grief; Apple encryption delay; post-quantum crypto” »

Dec 22, 2016

Experts split on how soon quantum computing is coming, but say we should start preparing now

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, information science, quantum physics

Let’s say closer to 7yrs or less.


Whether quantum computing is 10 years away — or is already here — it promises to make current encryption methods obsolete, so enterprises need to start laying the groundwork for new encryption methods.

A quantum computer uses qubits instead of bits. A bit can be a zero or a one, but a qubit can be both simultaneously, which is weird and hard to program but once folks get it working, it has the potential to be significantly more powerful than any of today’s computers.

Continue reading “Experts split on how soon quantum computing is coming, but say we should start preparing now” »

Dec 21, 2016

Ultra-small nanocavity advances technology for secure quantum-based data encryption

Posted by in categories: encryption, nanotechnology, quantum physics

Researchers have developed a new type of light-enhancing optical cavity that is only 200 nanometers tall and 100 nanometers across. Their new nanoscale system represents a step toward brighter single-photon sources, which could help propel quantum-based encryption and a truly secure and future-proofed network.

Quantum encryption techniques, which are seen as likely to be central to future data encryption methods, use individual as an extremely secure way to encode data. A limitation of these techniques has been the ability to emit photons at high rates. “One of the most important figures of merit for single-photon sources is brightness—or collected photons per second—because the brighter it is, the more data you can transmit securely with quantum encryption,” said Yousif Kelaita, Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab, Stanford University, California.

In the journal Optical Materials Express, Kelaita and his colleagues show that their new nanocavity significantly increased the emission brightness of quantum dots—nanometer-scale semiconductor particles that can emit single photons.

Continue reading “Ultra-small nanocavity advances technology for secure quantum-based data encryption” »

Page 17 of 33First1415161718192021Last