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Archive for the ‘energy’ category: Page 213

Aug 24, 2016

Soft, Rubbery ‘Octobot’ Can Move Without Batteries

Posted by in categories: energy, robotics/AI

A rubbery little “octobot” is the first robot made completely from soft parts, according to a new study. The tiny, squishy guy also doesn’t need batteries or wires of any kind, and runs on a liquid fuel.

The octopus-like robot is made of silicone rubber, and measures about 2.5 inches (6.5 centimeters) wide and long. The researchers say soft robots can adapt more easily to some environments than rigid machines, and this research could lead to autonomous robots that can sense their surroundings and interact with people.

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Aug 24, 2016

A breakthrough in the use of glass for power storage could unleash a torrent of innovation in the transportation and energy sectors

Posted by in categories: business, energy, information science, transportation

I never get tired of reading about the glass energy solutions.


Harnessing Big Data Power Promises Greater Rewards for Environment & Businesses

‘Ideal’ energy storage material for electric vehicles developed.

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Aug 24, 2016

Organic LEDs with low power consumption and long lifetimes

Posted by in categories: energy, mobile phones, quantum physics

A novel device architecture is used to simultaneously achieve extremely high internal quantum efficiencies, low drive voltages, and long lifetimes, at practical luminance levels.

An LED with an emissive organic thin film sandwiched between the anode and cathode is known as an organic-LED (OLED). The emission mechanism of an OLED is superficially similar to that of a standard LED, i.e., holes and electrons are injected from the anode and cathode, respectively, and these carriers recombine to form excited states (excitons) that lead to light emission.1 In recent years, smartphones and TVs with OLED displays have rapidly become widespread because OLEDs provide high contrast, a wide color gamut, light weight, thinness, and flexibility for the displays. OLEDs also have great potential for the creation of new lighting applications.2 The high power consumption and short lifetime of OLEDs, however, remain key issues.

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Aug 24, 2016

Steve Fuller’s Review of Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow by Yuval Noah Harari

Posted by in categories: big data, bioengineering, biological, bionic, cyborgs, disruptive technology, energy, evolution, existential risks, futurism, homo sapiens, innovation, moore's law, neuroscience, philosophy, policy, posthumanism, robotics/AI, science, singularity, theory, transhumanism

My sociology of knowledge students read Yuval Harari’s bestselling first book, Sapiens, to think about the right frame of reference for understanding the overall trajectory of the human condition. Homo Deus follows the example of Sapiens, using contemporary events to launch into what nowadays is called ‘big history’ but has been also called ‘deep history’ and ‘long history’. Whatever you call it, the orientation sees the human condition as subject to multiple overlapping rhythms of change which generate the sorts of ‘events’ that are the stuff of history lessons. But Harari’s history is nothing like the version you half remember from school.

In school historical events were explained in terms more or less recognizable to the agents involved. In contrast, Harari reaches for accounts that scientifically update the idea of ‘perennial philosophy’. Aldous Huxley popularized this phrase in his quest to seek common patterns of thought in the great world religions which could be leveraged as a global ethic in the aftermath of the Second World War. Harari similarly leverages bits of genetics, ecology, neuroscience and cognitive science to advance a broadly evolutionary narrative. But unlike Darwin’s version, Harari’s points towards the incipient apotheosis of our species; hence, the book’s title.

This invariably means that events are treated as symptoms if not omens of the shape of things to come. Harari’s central thesis is that whereas in the past we cowered in the face of impersonal natural forces beyond our control, nowadays our biggest enemy is the one that faces us in the mirror, which may or may not be able within our control. Thus, the sort of deity into which we are evolving is one whose superhuman powers may well result in self-destruction. Harari’s attitude towards this prospect is one of slightly awestruck bemusement.

Here Harari equivocates where his predecessors dared to distinguish. Writing with the bracing clarity afforded by the Existentialist horizons of the Cold War, cybernetics founder Norbert Wiener declared that humanity’s survival depends on knowing whether what we don’t know is actually trying to hurt us. If so, then any apparent advance in knowledge will always be illusory. As for Harari, he does not seem to see humanity in some never-ending diabolical chess match against an implacable foe, as in The Seventh Seal. Instead he takes refuge in the so-called law of unintended consequences. So while the shape of our ignorance does indeed shift as our knowledge advances, it does so in ways that keep Harari at a comfortable distance from passing judgement on our long term prognosis.

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Aug 23, 2016

Thermoelectric paper devices utilize waste heat to power electronics and sensors (w/video)

Posted by in categories: energy, nanotechnology, quantum physics

Luv this!!!


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Aug 22, 2016

China’s Race to Space Domination: To Try to Gain an Edge Here on Earth, China is Pushing Ahead in Space

Posted by in categories: energy, engineering, quantum physics, robotics/AI, space

More on China’s race on Space. Last Tuesday, China launched the 1st Quantum Satellite. In 2017, China is planning to be the dominant force in mining of Space. First stop — mining the dark side of the moon. Given China’s own history with environmental pollution plus mining’s damaging effects to the environment when not properly managed; etc. one must ponder how will space and Earth itself be impacted by such mining.


Before this decade is out, humanity will go where it’s never gone before: the far side of the moon. This dark side — forever facing away from us — has long been a mystery. No human-made object has ever touched its surface. The mission will be a marvel of engineering. It will involve a rocket that weighs hundreds of tons (traveling almost 250,000 miles), a robot lander, and an unmanned lunar rover that will use sensors, cameras, and an infrared spectrometer to uncover billion-year-old secrets from the soil. The mission also might scout the moon’s supply of helium-3 — a promising material for fusion energy. And the nation planting its starry flag on this historic trip will be the People’s Republic of China.

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Aug 22, 2016

World’s most efficient AES crypto processing technology for IoT devices developed

Posted by in categories: encryption, energy, finance, internet

Energy efficient IoT — proven to reduce energy usage by 50% via new technique for compressing the computations of encryption and decryption operations known as Galois field arithmetic operations.


Our research group has discovered a new technique for compressing the computations of encryption and decryption operations known as Galois field arithmetic operations, and has succeeded in developing the world’s most efficient Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) cryptographic processing circuit, whose energy consumption is reduced by more than 50% of the current level. With this achievement, it has become possible to include encryption technology in information and communication technology (ICT) devices that have tight energy constraints, greatly enhancing the safety of the next-generation Internet of Things (IoT). This result was announced on August 19, 2016 during the Conference on Cryptographic Hardware and Embedded Systems 2016 (CHES 2016) hosted by the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) in Santa Barbara, USA.

It is currently very common to exchange important personal or financial information over the Internet through ICT devices. Cryptographic techniques are used inside these devices to protect important information. In next-generation networks such as the IoT, which has attracted attention in recent years, it is expected that myriad devices will be connected to the network. Hence, it will be necessary to have built-in encryption technology in these connected devices to prevent malicious attacks. However, many battery or cell-driven devices with tight energy constraints are also included in the IoT and running energy-consuming encryption processes on these is a big challenge. One of the most widely used international standard encryption methods is AES. Since this is used in areas such as wireless LANs, it is very important for practical reasons to design energy-saving AES cryptographic processing.

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Aug 22, 2016

Chinese Search Giant Baidu Thinks AI Pioneer Andrew Ng Can Help It Challenge Google and Become a Global Power

Posted by in categories: energy, robotics/AI

Baidu is a fixture of online life in China, but it wants to become a global power. Can one of the world’s leading artificial intelligence researchers help it challenge Silicon Valley’s biggest companies?

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Aug 19, 2016

Audi’s New Suspension System Converts Potholes Into Energy

Posted by in categories: energy, transportation

Audi has designed an active suspension system called eROT, which allows the electromechanical dampers to store the energy from bumps and potholes for use in the car. It also makes the ride far smoother, adapting the car to the road.

The automotive industry’s ‘green revolution’ hopes to make electric vehicles far more efficient. Every bit of force under the hood should be used to its maximum potential. That why you have concepts such as regenerative braking, which return some of the energy used in braking back into the system.

But Audi is looking at tapping another roadway staple: potholes. It has created a system called eROT, an active suspension system that stores the energy when a driver hit potholes, bumps, and other forces that induce kinetic energy on a car.

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Aug 19, 2016

For The First Time Ever, Wind Power Generated 106% of Scotland’s Energy Needs

Posted by in categories: energy, sustainability

The environmental group, WWF Scotland, confirmed that on August 7, 2016, wind power alone generated 106% of Scotland’s electricity needs for the single day. This shows that with more development, renewables are capable of eventually replacing fossil fuels.

We have been harnessing the wind’s energy for hundreds of years. Traditionally, it has been used to pump water or grind grains with the help of windmills. But recently, windmill’s modern equivalent, the wind turbine, has just achieved an incredible feat—generating 106% of an entire nation’s electricity needs in just one day.

Data analysis from the environmental group, WWF Scotland, has confirmed that on August 7, 2016, wind turbines in Scotland pumped 39,545 megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity into the National Grid, while the nation’s total consumption stood at 37,202 MWh—which was 2,000 MWh over than what the nation consumed.

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