БЛОГ

Archive for the ‘government’ category: Page 3

Mar 16, 2019

Japan to back int’l efforts to regulate AI-equipped ‘killer robots’

Posted by in categories: government, policy, robotics/AI

Japan is hoping to play a lead role in crafting international rules on what has been called lethal autonomous weapons systems or LAWS.


Japan is planning to give its backing to international efforts to regulate the development of lethal weapons controlled by artificial intelligence at a UN conference in Geneva late this month, government sources said Saturday.

It would mark a departure from Japan’s current policy. The government was already opposed to the development of so-called killer robots that could kill without human involvement. But it had called for careful discussions when it comes to rules so as to make sure that commercial development of AI would not be hampered.

Continue reading “Japan to back int’l efforts to regulate AI-equipped ‘killer robots’” »

Mar 14, 2019

What If Google and the Government Merged?

Posted by in categories: climatology, economics, finance, government, sustainability

My colleague Conor Sen recently made a bold prediction: Government will be the driver of the U.S. economy in coming decades. The era of Silicon Valley will end, supplanted by the imperatives of fighting climate change and competing with China.

This would be a momentous change. The biggest tech companies — Amazon.com, Apple Inc., Facebook Inc., Google (Alphabet Inc.) and (a bit surprisingly) Microsoft Corp. — have increasingly dominated both the headlines and the U.S. stock market:

Read more

Mar 11, 2019

Tied up in red tape, Chinese scientists seek bigger say over research funding

Posted by in category: government

The authorities said the change was aimed at strengthening the government’s “research-driven development strategy” and “optimising the distribution of funding on science and technology”, while scientists said it meant funding approval would be more stringent.


Researchers say they spend so much time on grant applications that they get no time to do science.

Read more

Mar 7, 2019

Enter The Quantum World: What The Mechanics Of Subatomic Particles Mean For The Study Of UAP, Our Universe, And Beyond

Posted by in categories: business, government, particle physics, quantum physics

Then the 2017 DoD disclosure occurred, directly contradicting the findings in the Condon Report. We realized we had not discovered all there was to discover — not by a long shot.

AATIP succeeded where others failed simply because our understanding of the physics finally caught up to our observations.


Today, much of our government’s business is conducted behind closed doors, and mostly for good reason.

Continue reading “Enter The Quantum World: What The Mechanics Of Subatomic Particles Mean For The Study Of UAP, Our Universe, And Beyond” »

Mar 6, 2019

The A.I. Diet

Posted by in categories: food, government, information science, robotics/AI

Opinion

Forget government-issued food pyramids. Let an algorithm tell you how to eat.

Credit Credit Erik Blad

Continue reading “The A.I. Diet” »

Mar 5, 2019

Chinese developers’ New Year’s resolution – diversify into robotics, green cars and Beijing’s other pet projects

Posted by in categories: government, robotics/AI, transportation

To stay at the top of the tycoon pile, developers are quickly diversifying, embracing the government’s new pet industry – tech.

Read more

Mar 3, 2019

What our civilization needs is a billion-year plan

Posted by in categories: government, policy, solar power, space, sustainability

Circa 2012


Enlarge | +

Artist’s concept of a Kardashev Type 2 civilization (credit: Chris Cold)

Continue reading “What our civilization needs is a billion-year plan” »

Feb 28, 2019

Poll: Two Thirds of Americans Support Human Gene Editing to Cure Disease

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, government, health

Questions about using technologies like CRISPR to gene edit human embryos gained immediacy last month, when Chinese scientists claimed to have edited the genes of two babies in order to protect them against HIV — a move that prompted an international outcry, but also questions about when the technology will be ready for human testing.

“People appear to realize there’s a major question of how we should oversee and monitor use of this technology if and when it becomes available,” Columbia University bioethicist Robert Klitzman told the AP of the new research. “What is safe enough? And who will determine that? The government? Or clinicians who say, ‘Look, we did it in Country X a few times and it seems to be effective.

READ MORE: Poll: Edit baby genes for health, not smarts [Associated Press].

Continue reading “Poll: Two Thirds of Americans Support Human Gene Editing to Cure Disease” »

Feb 27, 2019

Approaching Y2Q and barely a peep (or tweet) from the government

Posted by in categories: computing, government, quantum physics

The countdown to the arrival of quantum computing has already begun. Here’s how the government can get ready.

Read more

Feb 26, 2019

The Bullish Case for Bitcoin

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, computing, economics, government

With the price of a bitcoin surging to new highs in 2017, the bullish case for investors might seem so obvious it does not need stating. Alternatively it may seem foolish to invest in a digital asset that isn’t backed by any commodity or government and whose price rise has prompted some to compare it to the tulip mania or the dot-com bubble. Neither is true; the bullish case for Bitcoin is compelling but far from obvious. There are significant risks to investing in Bitcoin, but, as I will argue, there is still an immense opportunity.

Never in the history of the world had it been possible to transfer value between distant peoples without relying on a trusted intermediary, such as a bank or government. In 2008 Satoshi Nakamoto, whose identity is still unknown, published a 9 page solution to a long-standing problem of computer science known as the Byzantine General’s Problem. Nakamoto’s solution and the system he built from it — Bitcoin — allowed, for the first time ever, value to be quickly transferred, at great distance, in a completely trustless way. The ramifications of the creation of Bitcoin are so profound for both economics and computer science that Nakamoto should rightly be the first person to qualify for both a Nobel prize in Economics and the Turing award.

For an investor the salient fact of the invention of Bitcoin is the creation of a new scarce digital good — bitcoins. Bitcoins are transferable digital tokens that are created on the Bitcoin network in a process known as “mining”. Bitcoin mining is roughly analogous to gold mining except that production follows a designed, predictable schedule. By design, only 21 million bitcoins will ever be mined and most of these already have been — approximately 16.8 million bitcoins have been mined at the time of writing. Every four years the number of bitcoins produced by mining halves and the production of new bitcoins will end completely by the year 2140.

Continue reading “The Bullish Case for Bitcoin” »

Page 3 of 7712345678Last