БЛОГ

Archive for the ‘information science’ category

Nov 14, 2019

Mathematicians Have Discovered an Entirely New Way to Multiply Large Numbers

Posted by in categories: computing, information science, mathematics

A pair of mathematicians from Australia and France have devised an alternative way to multiply numbers together, while solving an algorithmic puzzle that has perplexed some of the greatest math minds for almost half a century.

For most of us, the way we multiply relatively small numbers is by remembering our times tables – an incredibly handy aid first pioneered by the Babylonians some 4,000 years ago.

Continue reading “Mathematicians Have Discovered an Entirely New Way to Multiply Large Numbers” »

Nov 13, 2019

Cocktail Of Drugs Gives First Hope That ‘Biological Age’ Can Be Reversed

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, information science, life extension

What is needed as a cocktail is the Gerevivify Algorithms Serum Elixir. An Elixir that enters the body that then goes into battle fighting the infection that is aging. I search for strong-minded partners and investors to join me in the growth and development of the specially grown 13 ingredients that make up the powerful serum. Respect r.p.berry & AEWR https://gerevivify.blogspot.com/


“Fahy’s fascination with the thymus goes back to 1986, when he read a study in which scientists transplanted growth-hormone-secreting cells into rats, apparently rejuvenating their immune systems,” Nature reported. “He was surprised that no one seemed to have followed up on the result with a clinical trial. A decade later, at age 46, he treated himself for a month with growth hormone and DHEA, and found some regeneration of his own thymus.”

The thymus is located in the chest between the lungs and the breastbone and is crucial for efficient immune function. “White blood cells are produced in bone marrow and then mature inside the thymus, where they become specialized T-cells that help the body to fight infections and cancers,” Nature reported. “But the gland starts to shrink after puberty and increasingly becomes clogged with fat. Evidence from animal and some human studies shows that growth hormone stimulates regeneration of the thymus. But this hormone can also promote diabetes, so the trial included two widely used anti-diabetic drugs, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and metformin, in the treatment cocktail.”

Continue reading “Cocktail Of Drugs Gives First Hope That ‘Biological Age’ Can Be Reversed” »

Nov 11, 2019

The U.S. military, algorithmic warfare, and big tech

Posted by in categories: information science, military, robotics/AI

The U.S. military is preparing for the age of AI and algorithmic warfare, and it’s getting help from tech giants like Facebook, Google, and Microsoft.

Nov 10, 2019

Fake news via OpenAI: Eloquently incoherent?

Posted by in categories: information science, robotics/AI

OpenAI’s text generator, machine learning-powered—so powerful that it was thought too dangerous to release to the public, has, guess what, been released.

OpenAI published a blog post announcing its decision to release the algorithm in full as it has “seen no strong evidence of misuse so far.”

Well, that was a turnaround.

Nov 9, 2019

Goldman Sachs has created a market-ready robo advisor

Posted by in categories: finance, information science, robotics/AI

If Goldman Sachs’ new tool launches through Marcus, a human-digital hybrid approach would be a wise choice.


Goldman Sachs created a market-ready robo advisor and is mulling how to launch it, Financial Planning reports. The automated platform will represent Goldman’s digital entry into the smaller investor market, per Rachel Schnoll — who recently became the head of Goldman’s FinLife CX RIA platform — as cited by Financial Planning. The new robo advisor may be built in part on algorithms that Goldman acquired from financial life management firm United Capital, when it acquired the company for $750 million in May.

The new robo advisor could be introduced to the market via Goldman’s Marcus segment — here’s why it would be a good match. Goldman could extend a portion of the personal touch it brings to its Private Wealth Management clients to Marcus clients by offering them financial advice via the new robo advisor.

Continue reading “Goldman Sachs has created a market-ready robo advisor” »

Nov 8, 2019

Meet the scientist who thinks we all exist in multiple universes

Posted by in categories: alien life, information science, quantum physics

Have you ever laid wide-awake in the late hours of the night wondering what your life would look like if you took that other job, moved countries, or ended up with someone else? While there’s no definite answer — and probably never will be — the idea that there’s multiple versions of you, living in various universes, isn’t as make-believe as you might think.

According to Sean Carroll, a theoretical physicist at the California Institute of Technology and author of Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime, the increasingly popular theory of Many Worlds Interpretation suggests every fundamental event has multiple possible outcomes and splits the world into alternate realities.

This mind-bending idea originally came from Hugh Everett, a graduate student who wrote just one paper in the 1950s. Everett’s theory describes the universe as a “changing set of numbers, known as the wave function, that evolves according to a single equation.” According to Many Worlds, the universe continually splits into new branches, to produce multiple versions of ourselves. Carroll argues that, so far, this interpretation is the simplest possible explanation of quantum mechanics.

Nov 5, 2019

Scientists pinpoint the fastest way to learn something new

Posted by in categories: education, information science, robotics/AI

Learning something new — and quickly — may depend on the lesson’s difficulty level, according to a new study.

Flipping the classroom, room temperature, and later school-day start times, are just a few of the countless interventions scientists have tested and some educators have implemented.

Now, scientists say they have cracked the code on the optimal level of difficulty to speed up learning. The team tested how the difficulty of training impacts the rate of learning in a broad class of learning algorithms, artificial neural networks, and computer models thought to simulate learning in humans and animals.

Nov 4, 2019

It From Bit — Entropic Gravity For Pedestrians

Posted by in categories: cosmology, information science, quantum physics

Two and a half months since Erik Verlinde submitted his entropic gravity paper, and all of physics and cosmology has turned into entropy. Well, I am exaggerating a bit, and perhaps more than just a bit. Yet, fact is that within two weeks of Erik’s publication a steady stream of ‘entropic everything’ papers has developed at a rate of close to one paper per day. Gravity, Einstein’s equations, cosmic expansion, dark energy, primordial inflation, dark mass: it’s all entropic. Chaos rules. Entropy is king!

Or is it?

Could it be that an ‘entropic bandwagon’ has started rolling? Is this all not just a fad appealing to scientist tired of string theory? What is this elusive entropic force anyway? Do these folks really believe bits of information attract each other?

Nov 4, 2019

Project Silica proof of concept stores Warner Bros. ‘Superman’ movie on quartz glass

Posted by in categories: information science, nanotechnology, robotics/AI

Microsoft and Warner Bros. have collaborated to successfully store and retrieve the entire 1978 iconic “Superman” movie on a piece of glass roughly the size of a drink coaster, 75 by 75 by 2 millimeters thick.

It was the first proof of concept test for Project Silica, a Microsoft Research project that uses recent discoveries in ultrafast laser optics and artificial intelligence to store data in quartz glass. A laser encodes data in glass by creating layers of three-dimensional nanoscale gratings and deformations at various depths and angles. Machine learning algorithms read the data back by decoding images and patterns that are created as polarized light shines through the glass.

The hard silica glass can withstand being boiled in hot water, baked in an oven, microwaved, flooded, scoured, demagnetized and other environmental threats that can destroy priceless historic archives or cultural treasures if things go wrong.

Nov 3, 2019

Using an accurate measurement of the parameters of planetary bodies to constrain the mass of the graviton

Posted by in categories: information science, particle physics

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in France has revisited the idea of improving on estimates of the upper limit of the mass of a graviton. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their accurate measurement of the parameters of planetary bodies and what they found.

Einstein’s suggests that the gravity of large masses that warps spacetime comes from a theoretical massless particle called the graviton. Scientists have been trying for many years to either prove the theory correct or disprove it by finding a way to show that it has . One approach to such a proof involves studying the speed of the expansion of the universe—this approach has suggested that if the graviton does have a mass, its upper limit would be approximately 10 −32 electron-volts. Unfortunately, this result is based on a lot of assumptions, many of which are still controversial. Another way to do it is by studying planetary orbital deviations that could only come from a nonzero graviton mass—and starting with the assumption that if a graviton has zero mass, then like the photon, it should travel at the speed of light. In this new effort, the researchers have found a way to improve the accuracy of this approach.

The work involved temporarily freezing the motion of the stars and planets at different points in time—the first was the year 2000. The researchers found the masses, positions and speed of the sun, the planets and several asteroids for that year. They then ran equations that allowed them to roll forward in time to 2017 and back to 1913 and forward again as needed. These time periods were chosen because the team was able to find usable data for them. In running the calculations, the researchers found that they were able to come up with an estimation for the upper limit of the graviton of 6.76 × 10 −23—with a probability of 90 percent. The researchers note that their number was very close to that found by a team using data from the LIGO interferometers, but suggest that any similarities were purely coincidence.

Page 1 of 9612345678Last