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Archive for the ‘media & arts’ category: Page 4

Jun 27, 2019

By turning molecular structures into sounds, researchers gain insight into protein structures and create new variations

Posted by in categories: chemistry, media & arts, quantum physics

Researchers at MIT have developed a system for converting the molecular structures of proteins, the basic building blocks of all living beings, into audible sound that resembles musical passages. Then, reversing the process, they can introduce some variations into the music and convert it back into new proteins never before seen in nature. Credit: Zhao Qin and Francisco Martin-Martinez.


Want to create a brand new type of protein that might have useful properties? No problem. Just hum a few bars.

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Jun 27, 2019

How Russia’s Citizens Can’t Escape Their Largest Tech Company

Posted by in categories: business, food, habitats, media & arts

Five years ago, Yandex was just a search engine trying hard to fend off Google in its local market. Since then it has bought Uber Technologies Inc.’s Russia business, built its voice assistant into cars and home appliances, and more than doubled its revenue. Yandex now claims to have 108 million monthly users, which is about 75% of Russia’s population.


I’m woken up by an alarm on a home speaker designed by Yandex NV. I go to work in Yandex taxi listening to the company’s music-streaming service. My lunch is delivered by Yandex. Eats. I buy sneakers on the company’s Beru marketplace, and catch up on a series on its Kinopoisk smart-TV app in the evening.

You get the picture. Not so long ago, most decisions in Russia were decided by the state. Now, Russia’s largest tech company can cater to your every need.

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Jun 23, 2019

Cymascope, Cymatics, Apps, Music, Art

Posted by in category: media & arts

First “What-the-dolphin-saw” Image of a Submerged Man: Cymatic-Holographic Imaging Technique.


Home of Cymatics and the Cymascope for Research into sound and vibration creating Sonic Apps developed by John Stuart Reid, inspired by Dr. Hans Jenny.

Jun 12, 2019

MIT Used a Laser to Transmit Audio Directly Into a Person’s Ear

Posted by in categories: innovation, media & arts

Scientists have figured out how to use a laser to transmit audio, ranging from music to speech, to a person across a room without any receiver equipment — a potential breakthrough for the future of audio and communication.

“Our system can be used from some distance away to beam information directly to someone’s ear,” Massachusetts Institute of Technology research Charles M. Wynn said in a press release. “It is the first system that uses lasers that are fully safe for the eyes and skin to localize an audible signal to a particular person in any setting.”

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Jun 10, 2019

Mathematical Beauty Activates Same Brain Region as Great Art or Music

Posted by in categories: mathematics, media & arts, neuroscience

People who appreciate the beauty of mathematics activate the same part of their brain when they look at aesthetically pleasing formula as others do when appreciating art or music, suggesting that ther.

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Jun 6, 2019

Driverless cars: once they’re on the road, human drivers should be banned

Posted by in categories: media & arts, robotics/AI

Self-driving cars could revolutionise people’s lives. By the end of the next decade, or perhaps even sooner, they could radically transform public spaces and liberate us from the many problems of mass car ownership. They’ll also be much better behaved than human drivers.

Robot drivers won’t break the speed limit, jump the lights, or park where they shouldn’t. They won’t drive under the influence of drink or drugs. They’ll never get tired or behave aggressively. They won’t be distracted by changing the music or sending a text, and they’ll never be trying to impress their mates.

Driverless cars could also change the face of . Private cars are very expensive items that do absolutely nothing 95% of the time. They are economically viable only because paying a taxi driver for all your car journeys would be even more expensive. Once cars don’t need human drivers, this cost balance should tip the other way.

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May 15, 2019

Céline Dion — Ashes (from “Deadpool 2” Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Posted by in category: media & arts

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Celine Dion — Ashes (From the Deadpool 2 Motion Picture Soundtrack) (Official Music Video)
Listen on Spotify: http://smarturl.it/Celine_Spotify_EN
Listen on Apple Music: http://smarturl.it/Celine_AM_EN
Amazon: http://smarturl.it/Celine_Amazon_EN
Listen on Deezer: http://smarturl.it/Celine_Deezer
Listen on YouTube Music: http://smarturl.it/Celine_YTM

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May 15, 2019

David Bowie – Life On Mars? (Official Video)

Posted by in categories: alien life, media & arts

O.o.


Official video for Life On Mars? by David Bowie.

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May 10, 2019

How the Videogame Aesthetic Flows Into All of Culture

Posted by in categories: computing, media & arts

Videogames show us how digital media in general lend themselves easily to flow. For flow experiences often depend on repetitive actions, which contribute to the feeling of engagement and absorption that Csikszentmihalyi describes, and videogames—like all interactive computer interfaces, indeed like virtually all computer programs—operate on the principle of repetition. The user becomes part of the event loop that drives the action: her inputs to the controller, mouse, or keyboard are processed each time the computer executes the loop and are displayed as actions on the screen. The user not only experiences flow, she actually becomes part of the program’s flow. This is true, if in different ways, for applications throughout digital culture, such as YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter.

The most prominent and popular social media platforms appeal to their hundreds of millions of users in part through the mechanism of flow. The stereotype, which contains some grain of truth, is that flow culture is youth culture. Young people spend their days immersed in flows of text messages, tweets, Facebook posts, and streaming music, while older adults prefer to experience their media one at a time. For example, a Pew Research survey from 2012 showed that almost half of all adults between ages 18 and 34 use Twitter, whereas only 13 percent of adults over age 55 do. The younger you are, the more likely you are to multitask: those born after 1980 do so more than Generation X, which does so much more than the baby boomers.

Each of the genres of social media provides a different flow experience. YouTube, for example, remediates television and video for the World Wide Web. A typical YouTube session begins with one video, which the user may have found through searching or as a link sent to her. The page that displays that video contains links to others, established through various associations: the same subject, the same contributor, a similar theme, and so on. Channel surfing on traditional television can be addictive, but the content of one channel tends to have little to do with that of the next. YouTube’s lists of links and its invitation to search for new videos give the viewer’s experience more continuity, with the opportunity to watch an endless series of close variants.

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May 9, 2019

We Were Really Overdue For Laser Jackets

Posted by in categories: computing, media & arts, neuroscience, surveillance

Depending on who you talk to, everything is either fine, or we’re living in an oppressive cyberpunk dystopia in which we forgot to drench everything in colored neon lighting. There’s little to be done about the digital surveillance panopticon that stalks our every move, but as far as the aesthetic goes, [abetusk] is bringing the goods. The latest is a laser jacket, to give you that 2087 look in 2019.

The build starts with a leather jacket, which is festooned with 128 individual red laser diodes. These are ganged up in groups of 4, and controlled with 32 individual PWM channels using two PCA9685 controllers. An Arduino Nano acts as the brains of the operation, receiving input from a joystick and a microphone. This allows the user to control lighting effects and set the jacket to respond to sounds and music.

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