БЛОГ

Archive for the ‘neuroscience’ category: Page 3

Apr 25, 2019

New nanomedicine slips through the cracks

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, nanotechnology, neuroscience

In a recent study in mice, researchers found a way to deliver specific drugs to parts of the body that are exceptionally difficult to access. Their Y-shaped block catiomer (YBC) binds with certain therapeutic materials forming a package 18 nanometers wide. The package is less than one-fifth the size of those produced in previous studies, so it can pass through much smaller gaps. This allows YBCs to slip through tight barriers in cancers of the brain or pancreas.

The fight against cancer is fought on many fronts. One promising field is gene therapy, which targets genetic causes of diseases to reduce their effect. The idea is to inject a nucleic acid-based drug into the bloodstream—typically small interfering RNA (siRNA)—which binds to a specific problem-causing gene and deactivates it. However, siRNA is very fragile and needs to be protected within a nanoparticle or it breaks down before reaching its target.

“siRNA can switch off specific gene expressions that may cause harm. They are the next generation of biopharmaceuticals that could treat various intractable diseases, including cancer,” explained Associate Professor Kanjiro Miyata of the University of Tokyo, who jointly supervised the study. “However, siRNA is easily eliminated from the body by enzymatic degradation or excretion. Clearly a new delivery method was called for.”

Continue reading “New nanomedicine slips through the cracks” »

Apr 25, 2019

The Origin of Consciousness

Posted by in category: neuroscience

How unaware things became aware.

Support Kurzgesagt – In a Nutshell on Patreon so they can make more videos (and get cool stuff in return): https://www.patreon.com/Kurzgesagt?ty=h

Continue reading “The Origin of Consciousness” »

Apr 25, 2019

Brains of blind people adapt to sharpen sense of hearing, study shows

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

Now, a pair of research papers published the week of April 22 from the University of Washington — one in the Journal of Neuroscience, the other in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences — use functional MRI to identify two differences in the brains of blind individuals that might be responsible for their abilities to make better use of auditory information.

“There’s this idea that blind people are good at auditory tasks, because they have to make their way in the world without visual information. We wanted to explore how this happens in the brain,” said Ione Fine, a UW professor of psychology and the senior author on both studies.

Instead of simply looking to see which parts of the brain were most active while listening, both studies examined the sensitivity of the brain to subtle differences in auditory frequency.

Continue reading “Brains of blind people adapt to sharpen sense of hearing, study shows” »

Apr 25, 2019

This Video Game Detects Alzheimer’s Earlier Than Lab Tests

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, entertainment, neuroscience

Researchers say a new video game can tell researchers whether someone is at risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

Read more

Apr 25, 2019

Scientists discover coal-derived ‘dots’ are effective antioxidant

Posted by in categories: health, nanotechnology, neuroscience, quantum physics

Graphene quantum dots drawn from common coal may be the basis for an effective antioxidant for people who suffer traumatic brain injuries, strokes or heart attacks.

Their ability to quench after such injuries is the subject of a study by scientists at Rice University, the Texas A&M Health Science Center and the McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Quantum dots are semiconducting materials small enough to exhibit that only appear at the nanoscale.

Continue reading “Scientists discover coal-derived ‘dots’ are effective antioxidant” »

Apr 25, 2019

German scientists create see-through human ORGANS in step toward 3D-printed body parts

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, neuroscience

German scientists create see-through ORGANS in a step toward 3D-printed parts that could be transplanted in the human body…


Researchers in Germany have created transparent human organs using a new technology that could pave the way to print three-dimensional body parts such as kidneys for transplants.

Continue reading “German scientists create see-through human ORGANS in step toward 3D-printed body parts” »

Apr 25, 2019

Scientists have found a way to decode brain signals into speech

Posted by in category: neuroscience

It’s a step towards a system that would let people send texts straight from their brains.

Read more

Apr 24, 2019

Genetically modified virus may shrink incurable brain cancers

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, neuroscience

By Michael Le Page

People with incurable melanomas and brain or breast cancers are to get injections of tumour-fighting viruses.

The trial will test the safety of a virus that has been engineered to shrink tumours – an approach that holds promise for a range of cancers, including deadly brain tumours.

Continue reading “Genetically modified virus may shrink incurable brain cancers” »

Apr 24, 2019

New device translates brain activity into speech. Here’s how

Posted by in category: neuroscience

The research may one day give voice to people who lost speech from neurological disorders.

Read more

Apr 24, 2019

Synthetic speech generated from brain recordings

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, neuroscience

A state-of-the-art brain-machine interface created by UC San Francisco neuroscientists can generate natural-sounding synthetic speech by using brain activity to control a virtual vocal tract—an anatomically detailed computer simulation including the lips, jaw, tongue, and larynx. The study was conducted in research participants with intact speech, but the technology could one day restore the voices of people who have lost the ability to speak due to paralysis and other forms of neurological damage.

Stroke, , and such as Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease) often result in an irreversible loss of the ability to speak. Some people with severe speech disabilities learn to spell out their thoughts letter-by-letter using assistive devices that track very small eye or facial muscle movements. However, producing text or synthesized speech with such devices is laborious, error-prone, and painfully slow, typically permitting a maximum of 10 words per minute, compared to the 100–150 words per minute of natural speech.

Continue reading “Synthetic speech generated from brain recordings” »

Page 3 of 25612345678Last