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Archive for the ‘privacy’ category: Page 9

Jun 16, 2016

Media Reports: Xinjiang Residents Must Present DNA To Obtain Passports

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, internet, policy, privacy, terrorism

Biometrics using DNA along with other recognition technology brings additional identity protection; however, is it just me or are others understanding the risk with our DNA and other bio info being online given the existing weak infrastructure and under pinning technology. Without a QC secured internet and infrastructure; I would hesitate having my bio/ DNA information online for hackers and terrorists.

Once your identity with the DNA is online; it will be extremely hard to do a reset button on your identity because things like an id number such as a US Social Security number, etc. can be changed; but DNA identity is not that achievable even with CRISPR.


The official Yili Daily reported that from the first of June, residents of the Yili Kazakh Autonomous Prefecture in China’s far northwest must present the police with DNA samples, fingerprints, voice prints and a “three-dimensional image” when applying for travel documents.

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Jun 15, 2016

Global Biometrics Market Worth US$ 24.8 Billion by 2021 — Vein Scanner to Outpace Fingerprint Recognition Biometrics — Research and Markets

Posted by in categories: computing, government, information science, mobile phones, privacy, security

All is promising for Biometrics and biometric informatics; however, the technologies to date leveraged in IoT and other environments for parsing, analysis (especially predictive analysis), as well as better presented needs to be improved to be of value. We have seen great progress in the collection of the information and for some basic identification capabilities it looks good; however, to truly be effective and of value we need a lot more work done in this space especially when you look at today’s landscape of collecting information in areas of IoT and processing/ analysis with big data.


The global biometrics market is projected to cross US $ 24.8 billion by 2021. Fingerprint recognition biometric systems are the most preferred type of biometric systems used across the globe, owing to their ease of use, low cost, high speed and accurate results.

Biometric systems are used across various public as well as private offices for enhancing the security of data and information, as these systems provide an accurate validation as compared to traditional methods such as ID cards, PINs, passwords, etc. Increasing use of biometrics in e-commerce and cloud computing solutions, coupled with initiatives taken by the government of various countries across the world to adopt biometrics systems for identification and verification purposes are some of the major factors driving demand for biometric solutions, globally.

Moreover, introduction of e-passports and e-visas, use of biometrics in criminal identification, increasing demand for smartphones integrated with biometric technologies and implementation of biometric technology in election administration are anticipated to drive the global biometrics market over the next five years.

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Jun 15, 2016

U.S. intelligence community examining video analytics

Posted by in categories: privacy, robotics/AI, terrorism

With the element of terrorists in society today; things like video data/ information and biometrics will grow increasingly in demand within the immediate years a key peice that will require improvements in the timely performance and interpretation of the information via the technologies used to collect, analyze, interpret, and present the information to users as well as respecting the privacy of innocent civilians. However, Civilians will also need to do their own part in reasonableness of when and why certain sets of data must be collected.


The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), a division of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, will host a Proposers’ Day Conference for the Deep Intermodal Video Analytics (DIVA) program on July 12, 2016, in anticipation of the release of a new broad agency announcement (BAA) solicitation.

The purpose of the conference, which will be held in Washington, DC, will be to provide information on DIVA and the research problems the program aims to address, to address questions from potential proposers and to provide a forum for potential proposers to present their capabilities for teaming opportunities.

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Jun 15, 2016

Google and NSA Competing to Build World’s Most Powerful Quantum Computer

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, privacy, quantum physics, robotics/AI

Over the next 3 to 5 years you will see more and more in tech (medical/ bio, chip/ semiconductors, software, AI, services, platform, etc.) adopting QC in their nextgen products and services. We’re (as in Vern B. — D-Wave co-founder and CEO terms) in the Era of Quantum Computing. I highly urge techies to learn about QC so that you remain relevant.


Google is being driven by need to prevent the NSA from breaking into its system to access confidential personal data of its millions of users. On the other hand, the NSA is bent on cracking the tough encryption systems Google and other tech firms use to shield their information from them. Quantum computers will attain this aim for both Google and the NSA.

Google recently said it’s gotten closer to building a universal quantum computer. A team of Google researchers in California and Spain has built an experimental prototype of a quantum computer that can solve a wide range of problems and has the potential to be scaled up to larger systems.

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Jun 14, 2016

Five weirdest password alternatives of all time

Posted by in categories: business, computing, privacy

Computers can identify you based on your butt and your walk, not to mention your smell…

Around half of consumers would “choose anything but a traditional username and password account registration when given the option”, according to identity management firm Gigya.

But would they choose these truly bizarre password alternatives that have been proposed over the years, and would your business be safer switching to them? 1. Biometric Buttocks.

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Jun 14, 2016

Quantum technologies offer promise for data protection

Posted by in categories: privacy, quantum physics

1st, this article is full of inaccuracies such as 15 years away reported by NIST. Well, maybe 2 years ago they said this; however, in Jan. they and the NSA both stated that QC was less than 10 years away and a huge threat given the advancements by China. Also, this author writes that a hybrid system will be fine to withstand an attack by a hacker on QC. And, that s incorrect.

Also, if this article looks like another article published over a week ago by someone on Forbes; well it is because the author looks like copied word-for-word from the article in Forbes.

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Jun 7, 2016

Researchers Uncover a Flaw in Europe’s Tough Privacy Rules — By Mark Scott | The New York Times

Posted by in categories: internet, privacy

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““This poses a threat to whether the ‘right to be forgotten’ can be maintained in the long term,” said Keith Ross, the dean of engineering and computer science at N.Y.U. Shanghai who led the project and who said he had contacted Google with his research.”

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May 12, 2016

Advisory Committee expresses Quantum, legacy system concerns

Posted by in categories: military, privacy, quantum physics, security

NSA meets with Silicon Valley execs to voice their concerns over legacy systems being hacked by Quantum technology. Glad they’re talking about it because with the recent advancements in Quantum means it will be available in devices, communications, and platforms a lot sooner than originally projected.


The National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee (NSTAC) brought together Silicon Valley executives with federal officials at the advisory committee’s annual meeting on Wednesday in Santa Clara, California.

U.S. military and intelligence officials, including Department of Defense Secretary Ash Carter, Department of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, and Department of Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker, attended the advisory committee.

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May 5, 2016

US military agency DARPA: We want biometric tech to ID individual hackers

Posted by in categories: military, privacy

Of course; makes sense.


DARPA hopes it can ‘fingerprint’ individual cyberattackers and build a picture of their handiwork over time.

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Apr 4, 2016

FCC to stop ISPs from tracking you without consent

Posted by in category: privacy

This could definitely lead to other areas being controlled which could impact how companies can collect even demographics and profile online users for online ads, etc. Also, makes me wonder if we could even see a clamping down on how malls, stores, etc. collect data about consumers. I see major trickle down impacts from this.


The new rules make it nearly impossible for ISPs to track any information about your online activities, other than for network maintenance purposes.

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