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Archive for the ‘space travel’ category: Page 449

Nov 2, 2015

NASA Eagleworks has tested an upgraded Emdrive

Posted by in category: space travel

Paul March says Eagleworks has mitigated the issues raised by our Eaglework (EW)Lab’s Blue-Ribbon PhD panel and now Potomac-Neuron’s paper, on the possible Lorentz force interactions.

The issue was raised that there could be Lorentz Interactions with the dc currents on the EW torque pendulum (TP) with the stray magnetic fields from the torque pendulum’s first generation open-face magnetic damper and the Earth’s geomagnetic field.

EW built and installed a 2nd generation, closed face magnetic damper that reduced the stray magnetic fields in the vacuum chamber by at least an order of magnitude and any Lorentz force interactions it could produce.

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Nov 2, 2015

The world just got closer to a ‘hypersonic space plane’ that will transform ‘the economics of space’

Posted by in categories: economics, space travel

BAE just bought 20% of Reaction Engines. That’s a good indication it’s gonna happen!


BAE Systems, one of the world’s biggest aeronautics and defence firms, just made a significant investment in Reaction Engines.

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Nov 2, 2015

Is The Alcubierre Warp Drive Possible? | Space Time | PBS Digital Studios

Posted by in categories: physics, space travel

Is mankind capable of achieving warp speed?

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Oct 29, 2015

Study solves mysteries of Voyager 1‘s journey into interstellar space

Posted by in categories: physics, space travel

In a study published today in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, scientists from the University of New Hampshire and colleagues answer the question of why NASA’s Voyager 1, when it became the first probe to enter interstellar space in mid-2012, observed a magnetic field that was inconsistent with that derived from other spacecraft observations.

Voyager 1 sent back several different indications that it had punched through the edge of our sun’s massive protective bubble inflated by solar wind—the heliosphere—after a 35-year journey. But the magnetic field data gathered by the spacecraft was not what scientists had expected to see. The UNH-led study resolves the inconsistencies.

“There are still naysayers out there regarding Voyager 1 crossing through the heliopause—the edge of the heliosphere,” says astrophysicist Nathan Schwadron of the UNH Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space and department of physics and lead author of the paper. “And the reason for this doubt is that when the spacecraft supposedly broke through the heliopause we should have seen some sort of distinctive shift in the magnetic field from one medium to the other,” Schwadron says.

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Oct 29, 2015

Warp Factor 11 — ships powered by BLACK HOLES to “outpace Enterprise”, say scientists

Posted by in categories: cosmology, energy, food, space travel

The novel its a bit older, but it‘s an incredible vision!


When Star Trek’s Scotty warns the Captain that the engines can’t “take it”, he might just be best off switching fuel — a new book claims that humanity could reach the stars using vast spacecraft harnessing the energy of black holes with the power to “eat planets”.

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Oct 28, 2015

Russia announces plans to send humans to the Moon in 2029

Posted by in category: space travel

The Russian Federal Space Agency — commonly referred to as Roscosmos — just announced its plans to send humans to the Moon in 2029, RT News reported. It’s part of the agency’s ultimate goal of creating and maintaining a lunar station. Vladimir Solntsev, head of Roscomsos Energia, made the announcement Tuesday at a space and technology conference in Moscow; he noted that they are currently building the spacecraft for the mission now, with its first flight into space planned for 2021.

After its initial flight, the plan is to have the spacecraft dock with the International Space Station in 2023, according to Solntsev. Then in 2025, Roscosmos will send an uncrewed version of the spacecraft to the Moon, before finally sending astronauts in the vehicle in 2029.

It also looks like the European Space Agency may be along for the ride. Two weeks ago, BBC News reported that the ESA had been in talks with Roscosmos to collaborate on sending a lander to the Moon’s south pole. The mission, called Luna 27, would be the first in a series of missions that would eventually return humans to the lunar surface. “We have an ambition to have European astronauts on the Moon. There are currently discussions at international level going on for broad cooperation on how to go back to the Moon,” Bérengère Houdou, head of lunar exploration at ESA, told BBC News.

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Oct 28, 2015

A Simple Design Change Could Make a Thruster To Get Us to Mars

Posted by in categories: energy, particle physics, space travel

A Hall thruster is powering many of the satellites moving around Earth right now. It needs 100 million (yes, you read that right, 100 million) times less fuel than chemical thrusters. But it was never remotely sturdy enough to get anything to Mars—until now.

Typical chemical thrusters are pretty simple. Fuel combusts, gases shoot one way, and a rocket shoots the other way.

Ion thrusters are a little different. They contain charged electrodes, an anode and a cathode, and allow positively charged ions to shoot from the anode to the cathode. Thanks to momentum, the ions will “overshoot” the cathode. Under regular circumstances they’d be sucked back, but once they’ve cleared the cathode, they’re hit by a beam of electrons, neutralizing them and allowing them to go on their way without interference from the charged cathode. So the neutralized atoms shoot one way, and the rocket shoots another.

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Oct 27, 2015

Rachel Rose: artist sets out on Gravity-inspired space odyssey — By Charlotte Burns | The Guardian

Posted by in categories: media & arts, space, space travel

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“Wolf went for a walk over the world from the Mir Space Station in the late 1990s and saw the Earth seemingly vanish. His recollection so moved New York-based artist Rachel Rose when she heard it on NPR that she went to considerable lengths to track him down for a personal retelling.”

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Oct 27, 2015

Picasso in a space suit: the astronaut artist orbiting Earth — By Jonathan Jones | The Guardian

Posted by in categories: media & arts, robotics/AI, space, space travel

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Photographs taken by astronaut Scott Kelly from the International Space Station are beautiful – but could a robot do better?

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Oct 21, 2015

5 REAL Possibilities for Interstellar Travel | Space Time | PBS Digital Studios

Posted by in categories: energy, entertainment, quantum physics, space travel

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